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Candy Flavored Cigarettes: Still a Danger for Youth

by James Heller 28. August 2009 14:36
Since the mid-1960s, cigarette manufacturers have been targeting youth, ages 12 to 21, to smoke cigarettes by adding different flavors, such as menthol, to their cigarettes. The flavored cigarette business has continued to add new, “cool” flavors such as cinnamon and spice, vanilla, lemon menthol, berry, watermelon, and mocha. Additionally, the cigarettes are packaged in shiny, colorful tins with cartoons or hip-hop images, making it very appealing to youth.

The fruit- and candy-flavored enhanced cigarettes are just as addicting and harmful as traditional cigarettes and can provide a gateway for youth to develop severe tobacco addiction or to start using alcohol and other illicit drugs. According to the American Lung Association, approximately 4,000 kids smoke their first cigarette each day and one-third of those will become addicted.

The good news is that on June 22, 2009, President Obama signed a new anti-tobacco law, the Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act, to allow the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to help monitor and control the advertising and sale of tobacco products, including flavored cigarettes, to youth.

For more info:
Smoking and Teens Fact Sheet - American Lung Association site

http://www.lungusa.org/atf/cf/%7B7A8D42C2-FCCA-4604-8ADE-7F5D5E762256%7D/candyreport.pdf

Obama signs bill putting tobacco products under FDA oversight - CNN.com


Tarzana Treatment Centers in Los Angeles provides smoking cessation programs in alcohol and drug treatment as part of our commitment to integrated behavioral healthcare.  For more information, please call us now at 888-777-8565 or contact us here.

Southern California Locations for Alcohol and Drug Treatment
Tarzana Treatment Centers has locations all over Southern California in Los Angeles County. Other than our central location in Tarzana, we have facilities in Lancaster in the Antelope Valley, Long Beach, and in Northridge and Reseda in the San Fernando Valley.

Alcohol and Drug Abuse Effects on Oral Health

by James Heller 24. August 2009 14:01

We know that drug and alcohol abuse has many negative health effects, but something that is not frequently discussed are the harmful effects that drugs and alcohol can have on the health of our teeth, gums, and mouth in general.  Good oral health is not just about having pearly white and straight teeth.  

Having strong teeth and healthy gums/mouth helps you eat and digest food, and helps you speak and pronounce words clearly. Left untreated, decay on the teeth leads to the formation of cavities which can become infected and spread throughout your whole body making you sick

While all drugs can have negative effects on your teeth, gums, and mouth, methamphetamine (meth) and tobacco (both in cigarettes and smokeless) are the worst offenders.

Methamphetamine: The use of meth has been linked to rapid formation of cavities. Dentists think this could be due to teeth grinding and clenching, dry mouth, or poor oral hygiene all of which are linked to meth use. When left untreated, the only treatment is to pull out all the teeth and wear dentures.

For more information about meth and oral health go here: http://www.ada.org/prof/resources/topics/methmouth.asp#additional

Tobacco: Both cigarettes and smokeless tobacco have harmful effects on the health of the mouth. Cigarettes can lead to dry mouth and gum disease. Dry mouth negatively affects oral health because without saliva to rinse off the teeth, bacteria grows on teeth and near the gums which can quickly become decay which then leads to cavities. Smokeless tobacco seriously damages gums and increases the risk of oral cancer.

For more information about tobacco and oral health go here:
http://www.hooah4health.com/prevention/disease/dentaldisease/oralfitresources/TobaccoAndOralHealth.pdf

If you are concerned about the health of your teeth/gums there are a few easy steps to take:

  1. Make an appointment with your dentist; current guidelines recommend seeing your dentist every six months.
  2. Brush your teeth at least twice a day with toothpaste that contains fluoride. Fluoride keeps teeth strong and may stop or slow down the formation of decay.
  3. Floss your teeth daily. You must floss in order to remove food from in between teeth and near the gum line – your toothbrush does not reach everywhere in your mouth.
  4. Drink water – Sugary drinks (including alcohol) coat your teeth in sugar, which is the basis for tooth decay. By drinking water you are removing food and sugar from your teeth.


Visit this site for basic information about keeping your mouth, teeth, and gums healthy:
http://www.adha.org/oralhealth/index.html


Tarzana Treatment Centers in Los Angeles provides alcohol and drug treatment that includes nutritional education as part of our commitment to integrated behavioral healthcare.  For more information, please call us now at 888-777-8565 or contact us here.

Southern California Locations for Alcohol and Drug Treatment
Tarzana Treatment Centers has locations all over Southern California in Los Angeles County. Other than our central location in Tarzana, we have facilities in Lancaster in the Antelope Valley, Long Beach, and in Northridge and Reseda in the San Fernando Valley.

Smoking Cessation and Weight Control for Recovering Alcoholics and Drug Addicts

by James Heller 24. July 2009 09:37
For individuals with alcoholism or drug addiction who also consume tobacco products, nicotine is typically the last drug that they decide to give up.  There are various reasons why individuals in recovery from alcohol and drugs may decide to delay quitting tobacco use.  One of those reasons may be fear of gaining weight.  While some weight gain is normal (between 5 and 10 pounds during the first few months of tobacco cessation), there are several strategies that can be implemented to successfully keep weight under control.  Fear of weight gain should in no way impede a person's recovery from all harmful addictions.

Similar to other types of stimulant use, weight is affected because nicotine acts as an appetite suppressant.  If a person decides to quit smoking, they will need to be mindful of not replacing their smoking behavior with an increased consumption of food.  Food should not be used as a replacement for smoking.  Instead, a person can reach for a healthy snack or a piece of fruit and as much as possible remove tempting, high fat foods from the home.  With some attention to eating behavior, particularly the types and amounts of foods consumed, someone can safely make adjustments to minimize weight gain.  If a person's eating habits remain the same as they were when they smoked, any extra weight gain could be easily taken off with a daily 30 minute brisk walk or other type of exercise activity.  Always avoid alcohol consumption, which is not only high in calories, but can be a significant trigger back to smoking behavior.

Weight gain when you quit smoking shouldn’t prevent your determination to stay off all drugs and substances. Be good and patient with yourself because quitting smoking and recovering from alcohol and drugs is a process over time. The benefit of quitting now is that you will significantly increase your odds of having a healthy long-term recovery.  Don't let the fear of weight gain keep you chained to an addiction that will kill you, given the chance.  

For more information, please visit:

http://www.smokefree.gov/pubs/FFree3.pdf

http://www.pueblo.gsa.gov/cic_text/health/w8quit-smoke/

Tarzana Treatment Centers in Los Angeles makes a daily effort to find treatment news articles that we can share with our readers in the alcohol and drug treatment community.  The external content was found among other articles of equal informational and educational quality.

Southern California Locations for Alcohol and Drug Treatment
Tarzana Treatment Centers has locations all over Southern California in Los Angeles County and Orange County. Other than our central location in Tarzana, we have facilities in Lancaster in the Antelope Valley, Long Beach, in Northridge and Reseda in the San Fernando Valley, and in Santa Ana.

Nothing Cool About Smoking Hookah Tobacco

by James Heller 26. June 2009 14:54
The popularity of hookah lounges has recently exploded.  This can be seen by the sheer number of such places springing up throughout the United States – especially around university and junior college campuses.  People have the misconception that smoking a hookah pipe is cool and less dangerous than smoking cigarettes.  Not really.  What people know or have been told about hookah smoking is false and misleading.

For more information on the dangers of hookah tobacco use, click on the link below:

http://www.associatedcontent.com/article/329282/hookah_smoking_is_it_really_safe.html

Tarzana Treatment Centers is dedicated to educating tobacco smokers and assisting in smoking cessation programs.  Along with in-house programs and policies for patients and staff, we develop projects aimed at assisting other alcohol and drug treatment centers and primary care clinics to develop their own.

Southern California Locations for Alcohol and Drug Treatment
Tarzana Treatment Centers has locations all over Southern California in Los Angeles County and Orange County. Other than our central location in Tarzana, we have facilities in Lancaster in the Antelope Valley, Long Beach, in Northridge and Reseda in the San Fernando Valley, and in Santa Ana.

Simple Do’s and Don’ts to Help Someone Quit Smoking

by James Heller 26. June 2009 14:45
You might know someone engaged in alcohol and drug treatment or recovery who is trying to quit smoking, and want to help them achieve that goal.  Sometimes we don’t know what to say, how to motivate, how to deal with relapse, etc. when it comes to helping someone in alcohol and drug treatment or recovery quit and maintain a non-smoking status.  Click on the following link for some simple “Do’s and Don’ts” that everyone can use in helping someone undergoing alcohol or drug treatment or in recovery quit smoking.

Here is the link:

http://www.cancer.org/docroot/PED/content/PED_10_3x_Help_Someone_Quit.asp

Tarzana Treatment Centers is dedicated to educating tobacco smokers and assisting in smoking cessation programs.  Along with in-house programs and policies for patients and staff, we develop projects aimed at assisting other alcohol and drug treatment centers and primary care clinics to develop their own.

Southern California Locations for Alcohol and Drug Treatment
Tarzana Treatment Centers has locations all over Southern California in Los Angeles County and Orange County. Other than our central location in Tarzana, we have facilities in Lancaster in the Antelope Valley, Long Beach, in Northridge and Reseda in the San Fernando Valley, and in Santa Ana.

Second Hand Smoke Still Kills

by James Heller 26. June 2009 14:20
Despite strong scientific evidence and known cases of individuals dying from diseases due to secondhand smoke exposure, many alcohol and drug treatment providers still question whether they should seek to prevent second hand smoke exposure in their alcohol and drug treatment facilities.  In 2006, the California Air Resources Board (CARB) officially declared tobacco smoke a Toxic Air Contaminant! In addition, that same year, the United States Surgeon General issued a landmark report concluding that there is no safe level of exposure to secondhand smoke.

Second-hand smoke is a combination of poisonous gases, liquids and breathable particles that are harmful to your health. A non-smoker breathing second-hand smoke can be exposed to 4,000 different chemicals, 60 of which are carcinogenic. Second-hand smoke has twice as much nicotine and tar as the smoke that smokers inhale. It also has five times the carbon monoxide which decreases the amount of oxygen in your blood.

To learn more about the dangers of secondhand smoke, please click on the following link:  

http://www.cancer.org/docroot/PED/content/PED_10_2X_Secondhand_Smoke-Clean_Indoor_Air.asp

Tarzana Treatment Centers is dedicated to educating tobacco smokers and assisting in smoking cessation programs.  Along with in-house programs and policies for patients and staff, we develop projects aimed at assisting other alcohol and drug treatment centers and primary care clinics to develop their own.

Southern California Locations for Alcohol and Drug Treatment
Tarzana Treatment Centers has locations all over Southern California in Los Angeles County and Orange County. Other than our central location in Tarzana, we have facilities in Lancaster in the Antelope Valley, Long Beach, in Northridge and Reseda in the San Fernando Valley, and in Santa Ana.

US Veterans and Tobacco Addiction

by James Heller 16. June 2009 12:25
It should come as no surprise that U.S. military personnel and veterans use tobacco at higher rates than the general public.  The common picture, film, or portrait of soldiers typically includes someone smoking a cigarette, pipe or cigar.  There are several reasons for this long-term trend, and knowing them can help reduce future harm.  But those who are already tobacco addicts need to be educated and treated.

Education is needed to correct misconceptions among smokers.  The great majority of U.S. citizens, including smokers, know that cigarette smoking is harmful to one’s health and those around them.  But smokers also believe that tobacco brings relaxation, or an escape.  This belief leads a nicotine addict to ignore the harms and cherish the imagined benefits.

Tobacco smoking habits typically begin during military service for veterans.  Upon returning to civilian life, addicted to nicotine, the “learned behavior” that smoking cigarettes calms discourages them from quitting for health reasons.  It is so deeply engrained that education is necessary to change the thought process.

Education is a part of the whole nicotine addiction treatment process.  Treatment also needs to include individual and group counseling, as well as replacement therapy with nicotine patches, gums, or lozenges.  These can be included in an alcohol and drug treatment program, offering convenience and better health outcomes.

Tarzana Treatment Centers offers smoking cessation programs for interested patients in alcohol and drug treatment.  Our integrated behavioral healthcare program allows U.S. Veterans to receive alcohol and drug treatment, tobacco addiction treatment, and mental health treatment all under one roof, when the need arises.

The Department of Veterans Affairs offers some good information for veterans about tobacco use.  A portion of an article is below.  

-- Begin external content --

Veterans who receive their health care through VA are much more likely to smoke and use tobacco than the rest of the U.S. population. They also are heavier smokers and have higher rates of smoking-related illnesses. Many veterans have told us that they first began smoking in the military. In fact, during World War II and the Korean War, cigarettes were often provided free as part of K- rations. Many in the military thought then that smoking was a good way to help keep soldiers alert and awake in the battlefield and the command, "smoke 'em if you got 'em" is one that many older veterans remember. Recruits may have even been able to earn smoking breaks during military training and boot camp. Unfortunately, this early tobacco use led quickly to a lifetime addiction and a wide list of health-related problems.

-- Source: https://www.myhealth.va.gov/mhvPortal/anonymous.portal?_nfpb=true&_pageLabel=healthyLiving&contentPage=healthy_living/smoking_cessation_intro.htm --

Tarzana Treatment Centers in Los Angeles makes a daily effort to find treatment news articles that we can share with our readers in the alcohol and drug treatment community.  The external content was found among other articles of equal informational and educational quality.

Southern California Locations for Alcohol and Drug Treatment
Tarzana Treatment Centers has locations all over Southern California in Los Angeles County and Orange County. Other than our central location in Tarzana, we have facilities in Lancaster in the Antelope Valley, Long Beach, in Northridge and Reseda in the San Fernando Valley, and in Santa Ana.

Third-Hand Smoke

by James Heller 22. May 2009 10:54
Extensive research has proven that exposure to second-hand tobacco smoke is detrimental to one’s health. However, now researchers are warning that being exposed to third-hand smoke also poses danger to our health! Second-hand smoke is defined as tobacco smoke emitted from a lit cigarette, cigar, pipe, or hookah. On the other hand, “third hand-smoke is the stuff that remains, after visible or second-hand smoke has dissipated from the air” (Scientific American, 2009). The worry about exposure to third-hand smoke has existed for a while however; it has only been recognized and given a name in recent times.  

Tarzana Treatment Centers is dedicated to projects that assist alcohol and drug treatment providers and primary clinics with tobacco education and smoking cessation programs.  For more information, please call 888-777-8565 or contact us here.

Below is a portion of an article explaining third-hand smoke from Scientific American Online.  The full article explains the dangers posed by third-hand smoke to adults and children.

-- Begin external content --

How exactly do you distinguish between second- and third- hand smoke?
Third-hand smoke refers to the tobacco toxins that build up over time—one cigarette will coat the surface of a certain room [a second cigarette will add another coat, and so on]. The third-hand smoke is the stuff that remains [after visible or "second-hand smoke" has dissipated from the air]…. You can't really quantify it, because it depends on the space…. In a tiny space like a car the deposition is really heavy…. Smokers [may] smoke in another room or turn on a fan. They don't see the smoke going into a child's nose; they think that if they cannot see it, it's not affecting [their children].

-- Source: http://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=what-is-third-hand-smoke

Another article about third-hand smoke from the New York Times can be found at:
http://www.nytimes.com/2009/01/03/health/research/03smoke.html?_r=1

Tarzana Treatment Centers in Los Angeles makes a daily effort to find treatment news articles that we can share with our readers in the alcohol and drug treatment community.  The external content was found among other articles of equal informational and educational quality.