Tarzana Treatment Center Tarzana Treatment Center - Integrated Behavioral Healthcare - Call Now 1-800-996-1051

  Addiction Nutrition

Addiction Treatment

Adolescent Alcohol Abuse

Adolescent Alcohol Treatment

Adolescent Alcohol Treatment – Los Angeles

Adolescent Co-Occurring Disorders

Adolescent Drug Abuse

Adolescent Drug Addiction

Adolescent Drug Test

Adolescent Drug Treatment

Adolescent Drug Treatment – Los Angeles

Adolescent Heroin Abuse

Adolescent Marijuana Abuse

Adolescent Mental Health

Adolescent Prescription Drug Abuse

Adolescent Substance Abuse

Affordable Care Act (ACA)

Alcohol Abuse Facts

Alcohol Abuse in College

Alcohol and Drug Treatment

Alcohol Awareness Month

Alcohol Cravings

Alcohol Dependence

Alcohol Detox

Alcohol Facts

Alcohol Intervention

Alcohol Rehab

Alcohol Tolerance

Alcohol Treatment

Alcohol Treatment - Los Angeles

Alcohol Use Quiz

Alcohol Withdrawal

Alumni Association

Behavioral Addictions

Benzodiazepine Abuse

Benzodiazepine Tolerance

Benzodiazepine Withdrawal

California Budget Issues

California Drug Trends

California Telehealth Network (CTN)

Cocaine Addiction

College Alcohol Abuse

Community Counseling

Community Healthcare

Community Involvement

Community Programs

Co-occurring Disorders

Covered CA

Domestic Violence

Drug Abuse Facts

Drug Addiction

Drug Dependence

Drug Detox

Drug Intervention

Drug Overdose

Drug Rehab

Drug Tolerance

Drug Treatment

Drug Treatment - Los Angeles

Drug Withdrawal

Drug Withdrawal Symptoms

Dual Diagnosis

Ecstasy

Family Alcoholism

Family Drug Addiction

Gender Responsive Treatment

Gender Specific Treatment

Hallucinogens

Harm Reduction

Healthcare

Healthcare Integration

Healthy Way LA

Help With Alcohol

Help With Drugs

Heroin Addiction

Heroin Cravings

Heroin Detox

Heroin Treatment

Heroin Withdrawal

HIV and Drugs

HIV Test

HIV/AIDS Treatment

Homelessness and Addiction

Integrated Behavioral Healthcare

Intervention

Learn About Addiction

LGBT Alcohol Treatment

LGBT Drug Treatment

LSD

Marijuana Addiction

Medical Care

Medical Detoxification

Medicare

Medication Assisted Treatment

Mental Health Month

Mental Health Treatment

Methadone

Methadone Maintenance

Methamphetamine Addiction

Methamphetamine Treatment

Methamphetamines

Military Alcohol Treatment

Military Drug Treatment

Military Mental Health Treatment

Naltrexone for Heroin

Naltrexone for Opiates

Native American Alcohol Dependence

Native American Alcohol Treatment

Native American Community Outreach

Native American Culture

Native American Drug Addiction

Native American Drug Treatment

Native Americans and Alcohol

Nicotine Addiction

Online Alcohol Treatment

Online Counseling

Online Drug Treatment

Online Medical Care

Online Mental Health Treatment

Online Therapy

Opiate Abuse

Opiate Addiction

Opiate Addiction Treatment

Opiate Cravings

Opiate Detox

Opiate Tolerance

Opiate Treatment

Opiate Withdrawal

Opioid Abuse

Opioid Detox

Opioid Treatment

Opioid Withdrawal

Pain Killer Addiction

Pain Killer Detox

Pain Killer Treatment

Pow Wow-Upcoming Events

Prescription Drug Abuse

Prescription Drug Addiction

Prescription Drug Detox

Prescription Drug Overdose

Prescription Drug Side Effects

Prescription Drug Tolerance

Prescription Drug Treatment

Prescription Drug Withdrawal

Preventative Care

Primary Care

Promising Practices

Prop 36 Funding

Quitting Smoking

Recovery Month 2009

Recovery Month 2010

Relapse Issues

Relapse Prevention – Alcohol

Relapse Prevention – Drugs

Second Hand Smoke

Senior Alcohol Abuse

Senior Drug Abuse

Senior Medical Care

Senior Substance Use

Seniors Mental Health

Smoking Cessation

STD Awareness Month

Stimulant Addiction

Stimulant Detox

Stimulant Withdrawal

Substance Abuse Treatment

Technology in Health Care

Teen Alcohol Abuse

Teen Alcohol Treatment

Teen Drug Abuse

Teen Drug Addiction

Teen Drug Testing

Teen Drug Treatment

Teen Marijuana Abuse

Teen Prescription Drug Abuse

Teen Recovery

Teledermatology

Telemedicine

Telemental Health

Temporary Housing

Therapy

Third-Hand Smoke

Tobacco

Tobacco – Youth

Treatment Advocacy

Treatment News

Upcoming Events

Veteran Women Treatment

Veterans – Homelessness

Veterans Alcohol and Drug Treatment

Veterans Alcohol Treatment

Veterans and Prescription Drugs

Veterans Drug Addiction

Veterans Drug Detox

Veterans Drug Treatment

Veterans Mental Health Treatment

Vivitrol

Vivitrol for Heroin

Vivitrol for Opiates

Volunteer

Wellbriety

Wellness

Women-only Treatment

Youth Alcohol Abuse

Youth Alcohol Treatment

Youth Drug Abuse

Youth Drug Addiction

Youth Drug Treatment

Youth Marijuana Abuse

Youth Prescription Drug Abuse

 

Heroin and Fentanyl are Bad Partners

by James Heller 13. February 2014 08:36
Tarzana Treatment Centers provides a variety of heroin treatment options because the drug is so highly addictive, unpredictable, and deadly.  Now the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) has released a warning about fentanyl-contaminated heroin.  So we are passing this warning on to the public, and reminding heroin addicts and their loved ones that help is just a phone call away.
 
 
Even if it was possible to satisfy an addiction by using the same amount of heroin every day, it would not guard against overdoses.  Drug dealers don’t have testing labs to ensure purity of the heroin they sell to their clients.  In fact, dealers are more likely to cut the purity of the heroin they sell or add another drug to boost the potency.  Addicts gamble every day, hoping to get the perfect fix, and praying that it won’t be their last.

SAMHSA is trying to get ahead of an epidemic by warning that fentanyl is being used to increase the potency of heroin in Eastern states of the United States.  Fentanyl is a very strong opioid pain killer, and mixing it with heroin increases the risk of severe injury or death.  It is possible that the use of this opioid cocktail is to blame for 39 deaths in Pennsylvania and Rhode Island from the start of 2014 to February 6th.  That’s more than 1 death every day since the year began.

SAMHSA is asking everyone to review their Opioid Overdose Prevention Toolkit at this link:
 
Tarzana Treatment Centers provides services that all have a goal of abstinence.  Medical Detoxification is a systematic withdrawal using medication to reduce withdrawal symptoms.  Vivitrol injections reduce cravings for heroin after detox when the body is no longer opioid dependent.  For individuals who have relapsed multiple times, we offer Methadone Maintenance or Buprenorphine Maintenance coupled with counseling to keep you on the road to abstinence.

All of our heroin treatment options include counseling.  We offer individual and group sessions, and we include family in treatment whenever it’s possible.

Tarzana Treatment Centers in Los Angeles provides a full array of health care services including adult and youth alcohol and drug treatment.  We specialize in treatment for mental health and substance use disorders, and have two primary medical care clinics in the San Fernando Valley and Antelope Valley and specialized services for HIV/AIDS care.  If you or a loved one needs help with alcohol dependencedrug addiction, or co-occurring mental health disorders or from other services we offer, please call us now at 888-777-8565 or contact us using our secure contact form.
  
Telemedicine services are also available with online medical care, online mental health treatment, and online alcohol and drug treatment.

Southern California Locations for Alcohol and Drug Treatment
Tarzana Treatment Centers has locations all over Southern California in Los Angeles County. Other than our central location in Tarzana, we have facilities in Lancaster in the Antelope Valley, Long Beach, and in Northridge and Reseda in the San Fernando Valley.

How to Work with Relapse

by James Heller 11. February 2014 15:16
Relapse is not the end of recovery.  It’s not recommended, either, and those of us who treat for substance use disorders can’t condone the behavior.  Still, it’s more effective to take a positive approach to recovery after a relapse than it is to be angry and condemn the addict.
 
 
Recovery from alcoholism or drug addiction is an ongoing process, and abstinence is not a lifetime guarantee.  Most alcoholics and addicts relapse at least once before achieving long-term abstinence, if they make it.  Even short-term abstinence is a miracle for those who are heavily dependent on alcohol or heroin, for example.
When an individual with more than a few months of recovery relapses, those around them usually find it difficult to accept as being a normal occurrence.  It’s easy to forget how hard it was to get a loved one into treatment when life with them begins to feel “normal”.  The natural reaction for family members is to think they didn’t do enough, so anger and sadness result.

Going back to substance use does not mean an addict has given up, though.  It just means that progress has taken a step backward, meaning that something wasn’t addressed during treatment or coping skills need to be improved.  Both of these can be corrected with further counseling.  From this perspective, a relapse can be seen as a lesson rather than a failure.

Understanding this can reduce the anger among family members, and could hasten the trip back to rehab.  It’s better to lovingly encourage treatment rather than to react and increase pressure on the addict.  Of course the family of an addict needs to make it known that getting back on the road to recovery is the only acceptable outcome.  With a positive attitude, this can be done in a more loving tone that is more-likely to lead the addict in the right direction.
 
Tarzana Treatment Centers in Los Angeles provides a full array of health care services including adult and youth alcohol and drug treatment.  We specialize in treatment for mental health and substance use disorders, and have two primary medical care clinics in the San Fernando Valley and Antelope Valley and specialized services for HIV/AIDS care.  If you or a loved one needs help with alcohol dependencedrug addiction, or co-occurring mental health disorders or from other services we offer, please call us now at 888-777-8565 or contact us using our secure contact form.
 
Telemedicine services are also available with online medical care, online mental health treatment, and online alcohol and drug treatment.

Southern California Locations for Alcohol and Drug Treatment
Tarzana Treatment Centers has locations all over Southern California in Los Angeles County. Other than our central location in Tarzana, we have facilities in Lancaster in the Antelope Valley, Long Beach, and in Northridge and Reseda in the San Fernando Valley.

Let's Learn from Hoffman's Death

by James Heller 4. February 2014 14:09
Philip Seymour Hoffman died of a heroin overdose on Super Bowl Sunday, February 2, 2014.  This generation lost a great talent, who delivered impeccable performances in Capote, Charlie Wilson’s War, and The Master.  Heroin addiction doesn’t care about people with the disorder, though, and it isn’t shocking when a life is lost.

Philip Seymour Hoffman 2011

Friends and associates in the entertainment industry posted their sorrow over the loss on social media.  Many of them said they were “shocked” while sharing other painful emotions. These were written by individuals who knew him well and who worked with him in the past.  

He had 3 children under the age of 11, and he was found dead because a friend went to his apartment to find out why he had failed to pick them up that morning.  According to a New York Daily News article, a mix of 50 full and empty bags of heroin were found there.  This indicates that heroin addiction doesn’t care about family members either, and it took a father away from his children.

Here is the final entry in Hoffman’s IMDb bio on 02/13/14:

On February 1st (sic-2nd), 2014, Philip Seymour Hoffman was found dead in an apartment in Greenwich, Connecticut. Investigators found Hoffman with a syringe in his arm and two open envelopes of heroin next to him. Mr. Hoffman was long known to struggle with addiction. In 2006, he said in an interview with "60 Minutes" that he had given up drugs and alcohol many years earlier, when he was age 22. In 2013, he checked into a rehabilitation program for about 10 days after a reliance on prescription pills resulted in his briefly turning again to heroin.
- IMDb Mini Biography By: Jon C. Hopwood

No note was left in the apartment, so the going assumption is that the heroin overdose was accidental.  If that’s true, and we can accept that it is, he was at least intent on using a lot of heroin in the near future and probably believed that he could control dosages.  This is common thinking for addicts.  He thought he could live a normal life with his addiction in tow.  But addiction always takes the lead.  He may even have been looking forward to a great day with his kids all the way up to when his body succumbed to the heroin intake.  

It’s difficult to judge the honesty of an addict, especially one who has immediate access to his drug of choice and any place in the world to hide out and use it.  We don’t doubt that he was a decent person, but that’s beside the point.  It’s possible that he was nursing a habit for some time.  But let’s consider that he was clean for over 20 years, and take him at his word.

Addicts who relapse can’t use the same amount of a drug that they had used before they got clean.  They need to build tolerance again, which takes time.  But addiction in action is not logical.  If this was his first time using after some clean time, then his body could not have handled the amount of heroin his addiction needed to be satisfied.  This could still be the case if he had been using heroin for several months.  Sometimes the addiction just can’t be satisfied and the chase for a high results in tragedy.
With heroin use comes some noticeable physical and behavioral changes.  Anyone close to that person could notice that there is a problem.  Very few of them will say anything, though, when the addict is a celebrity or in a position of power.  This is tragic on two levels because the addict doesn’t get help and dies, and fans might gloss over the unnecessary end as being an accident.  Nobody learns about the horrors of heroin addiction from this scenario.

If Hoffman had been using for some time, then those who knew him should not have been shocked over the overdose.  This is certainly not meant to blame anyone, given that most Americans are just not educated about this drug.  Heroin may be good at filling a void in an addict’s soul, but it is downright dangerous to the human body.  Heroin addicts are destined for death if they don’t get help.  The addiction does not allow a person to regulate use and enjoy life.  Heroin is strictly a killer.

We need to learn from this and take action.  Heroin addiction is never in a casual state, and requires treatment.

Our facilities offer medical detoxificationoutpatient, and residential treatment for heroin addiction.  Treatment options include Medication Assisted Treatment (MAT) using Vivitrol during abstinence or Methadone/Buprenorphine Maintenance for harm reduction after multiple relapses.  Many of our heroin addiction treatment services are covered by Medi-Cal or Medicare, for those who qualify, and we accept all forms of insurance.  

Tarzana Treatment Centers in Los Angeles provides a full array of health care services including adult and youth alcohol and drug treatment.  We specialize in treatment for mental health and substance use disorders, and have two primary medical care clinics in the San Fernando Valley and Antelope Valley and specialized services for HIV/AIDS care.  If you or a loved one needs help with alcohol dependencedrug addiction, or co-occurring mental health disorders or from other services we offer, please call us now at 888-777-8565 or contact us using our secure contact form.
 
Telemedicine services are also available with online medical care, online mental health treatment, and online alcohol and drug treatment.

Southern California Locations for Alcohol and Drug Treatment
Tarzana Treatment Centers has locations all over Southern California in Los Angeles County. Other than our central location in Tarzana, we have facilities in Lancaster in the Antelope Valley, Long Beach, and in Northridge and Reseda in the San Fernando Valley.

Vivitrol Questions and Answers

by James Heller 15. October 2012 11:56
Tarzana Treatment Centers provides Vivitrol as part of our Medication Assisted Treatment (MAT) program.  Here are some answers to frequently asked questions:
 
 
What is Vivitrol?

Vivitrol is a monthly injection of Naltrexone that is FDA approved for alcohol and opiate craving reduction.  This treatment reduces your risk of relapse by minimizing one of the major triggers that can lead you back to drinking or using drugs.  By clearing the mind of cravings, Vivitrol enables you to focus on treatment and the core issues you need to process.  All of this enhances your chance to achieve long-term recovery.

How much does Vivitrol cost?

The best answer to this is: Call us to find out.

As is the case with many medications, it is difficult to provide a solid price in a blog article.  How much you pay for Vivitrol at Tarzana Treatment Centers depends on whether you have health care coverage and from which funding source.  If you search websites for a price you will see prices varying by over $1000, which does you no good.  

Tarzana Treatment Centers accepts Medicare and Medi-Cal for Vivitrol treatment, with funding through AB 109 and LA Drug Court also available.  Also, there are rebate programs that come and go, so it would be irresponsible to publish a set price for individuals who opt to pay cash for the treatment.

What are the side effects of Vivitrol?

The most up-to-date list of side effects can be found on the Home page of the Vivitrol website at http://www.vivitrol.com.  It is important for you and your primary care physician to know these facts because, like many helpful medications, you may not be in a position to take Vivitrol.  

At Tarzana Treatment Centers, no patients have suffered severe side effects.  Minor injection site pain is often reported, along with other minor side effects.  They also report that these effects dissipate in a day or two.  We’ve also had patients who report no negative side effects at all.  It needs to be noted that the great majority of patients starting Vivitrol treatment get their first injection following medical detoxification.  So the body is going through changes that can cause pangs of one form or another anyway.  

More Questions?

Please contact us today.  We will be happy to answer your questions so you or your loved one can get the treatment needed.

Tarzana Treatment Centers in Los Angeles provides a full array of health care services including adult and youth alcohol and drug treatment.  We specialize in treatment for mental health and substance use disorders, and have two primary medical care clinics in the San Fernando Valley and Antelope Valley and specialized services for HIV/AIDS care.  If you or a loved one needs help with alcohol dependencedrug addiction, or co-occurring mental health disorders or from other services we offer, please call us now at 888-777-8565 or contact us using our secure contact form.

Telemedicine services are also available with online medical care, online mental health treatment, and online alcohol and drug treatment.

Southern California Locations for Alcohol and Drug Treatment
Tarzana Treatment Centers has locations all over Southern California in Los Angeles County. Other than our central location in Tarzana, we have facilities in Lancaster in the Antelope Valley, Long Beach, and in Northridge and Reseda in the San Fernando Valley.

If Doctors Would Diagnose Addiction

by James Heller 5. September 2012 14:10
If you consider that there are an estimated 22 million Americans with a drug or alcohol problem, you might assume that doctors regularly diagnose and treat them.  Reality is, though, that most doctors have never been trained to in addiction treatment, and usually treat only the symptoms of the disease.  Fortunately, some new treatments involving medications may change this sad situation.
 
 
One big problem with alcoholism and drug addiction is that so many medical problems result from them.  Substance abuse negatively affects different parts of the body, depending on the drug being used.  Alcohol abuse, without exaggeration, harms every cell in the body.  To the untrained in addiction medicine, the symptoms of these abuses might appear as primary problems, only requiring common treatments.  For example, a doctor may prescribe specialized medication for a bleeding ulcer and schedule a follow-up visit.

Another problem with addiction is that alcoholics and drug addicts are not quick to admit their problems.  Even if a doctor asks about drinking and drug use habits, these patients will minimize or deny it.  Short of the patient arriving at 9:00am and smelling of alcohol, or having injection track marks up and down their arms, untrained doctors will not see a reason to investigate.  The answer is often accepted as true and the doctor looks to heal the symptom.  

The result is that alcoholics and drug addicts get temporary relief from negative symptoms of their disease, but don’t receive, at the very least, guidance from their doctors on how to prevent them in the future.  The worst result is that people die every day from the negative effects of alcoholism and drug addiction.  Most of them could have been saved had they been given early treatment for the primary disease of addiction.

According to this article, there is possible good news on the horizon.  There is an effort to attract doctors to the addiction treatment field, and to promote addiction medicine as a recognized subspecialty.  Medical treatment and new prescription drugs are proving to be effective means of helping addicts to recover.  Counseling for the psycho-social aspects of the disease is still important, but detox and craving reduction medications, like Vivitrol, have become very beneficial in the early days of recovery.

Tarzana Treatment Centers provides Vivitrol treatment for alcohol and opiate craving reduction, for example.  This follows medical detoxification, which is important to avoid the severe effects of withdrawals.  We have seen some great success stories from patients who previously struggled with relapse after their first Vivitrol injection.  

Imagine if doctors could diagnose addiction from the symptoms they normally treat.  They could make a referral to a detox facility, followed with Vivitrol for eligible patients, and maybe residential or outpatient treatment.  Patients tend to listen to doctors more than they would even to their most beloved family members.  Hopefully, the effort mentioned above can spread so more of those who suffer can get the treatment they need.

Tarzana Treatment Centers in Los Angeles provides a full array of health care services including adult and youth alcohol and drug treatment.  We specialize in treatment for mental health and substance use disorders, and have two primary medical care clinics in the San Fernando Valley and Antelope Valley and specialized services for HIV/AIDS care.  If you or a loved one needs help with alcohol dependencedrug addiction, or co-occurring mental health disorders or from other services we offer, please call us now at 888-777-8565 or contact us using our secure contact form.

Telemedicine services are also available with online medical care, online mental health treatment, and online alcohol and drug treatment.

Southern California Locations for Alcohol and Drug Treatment
Tarzana Treatment Centers has locations all over Southern California in Los Angeles County. Other than our central location in Tarzana, we have facilities in Lancaster in the Antelope Valley, Long Beach, and in Northridge and Reseda in the San Fernando Valley.

Lock It Up is a Good Start

by James Heller 6. July 2012 15:16
Prescription drug use among teens has increased over the past few years.  Benzodiazepines and opiate painkillers can produce a type of euphoria and carry the illusion of being safe, so adolescents are more inclined to try them over other drugs.  Studies show youths saying that these drugs are easier to obtain than alcohol.  So a program in Fresno, CA, named Lock It Up, aims to cut the supply from its largest source.

Lock It Up is an awareness campaign that will educate the public about prevention efforts that can be implemented in the home.  Here is a little more information:

The article states that “More than 70 percent of teens who abuse prescription painkillers say they get them from family, relatives and friends.”  What they don’t mention is that most of the people they get the drugs from have no idea that they are gone.  This is why the Lock It Up project is such a good idea.  Most parents will quickly take action if they know that they are unwittingly supplying the teen prescription drug trade.

When non-addict adults are prescribed painkillers or anti-anxiety medications, like Xanax, they will often not use the entire amount of pills prescribed to them.  The need for them runs its course or they just don’t like them, and they leave remaining pills to be forgotten.  This leaves 5, 10, 20, or more powerful tablets unattended in the medicine cabinet.  Even if the empty bottle is found after the pills are long gone, a child may have already overdosed on them.

Fresno citizens will learn to lock away or dispose of medications properly.  This can put a very large dent in the prescription drug street market.  Both parents and teens need to know that prescription drugs are not safe for recreational use, and they can easily cause fatalities from an overdose.  Opiates and benzodiazepines are highly addictive, and can ruin a teen’s growing years and cause struggles in adulthood.  Let’s all follow Fresno’s lead.

Tarzana Treatment Centers in Los Angeles provides a full array of health care services including adult and youth alcohol and drug treatment.  We specialize in treatment for mental health and substance use disorders, and have two primary medical care clinics in the San Fernando Valley and Antelope Valley.  If you or a loved one needs help with alcohol dependencedrug addiction, or co-occurring mental health disorders, please call us now at 888-777-8565 or contact us using our secure contact form.

Telemedicine services are also available with online medical care, online mental health treatment, and online alcohol and drug treatment.

Southern California Locations for Alcohol and Drug Treatment
Tarzana Treatment Centers has locations all over Southern California in Los Angeles County. Other than our central location in Tarzana, we have facilities in Lancaster in the Antelope Valley, Long Beach, and in Northridge and Reseda in the San Fernando Valley.

Methadone Maintenance Brings Positive Outcomes

by James Heller 15. June 2012 13:09
Opiates are highly addictive and either controlled or illegal.  This combination of factors most often leads to increasing doses, which can cause the loss of employment, financial issues, and engagement in criminal activity.  Opiates, like heroin, are often administered intravenously, which also increases the risk of infection with HIV, hepatitis, and other blood-borne pathogens.   So there is a great risk of harm for those who find abstinence-only treatment difficult to maintain. 

Because opiate addiction impacts the addicted individual and society in the way described above, the treatment approach must include more than the traditional detox-to-abstinence model.  Abstinence should always be the ultimate goal.  The road to abstinence, though, may require a period of Medication Assisted Treatment (MAT) using Methadone Maintenance.  This could be a lifesaving step in the recovery process for many opiate addicts.

Methadone Maintenance has been proven effective as a “harm reduction” treatment method.  The linked paper below shows the true and positive effects of Methadone Maintenance.  The fact is that this form of treatment reduces health risks, crime, unemployment, and improves treatment outcomes for individuals who previously believed they had no hope of breaking their addiction cycle.


Tarzana Treatment Centers offers Methadone Maintenance to qualified individuals.  During this MAT treatment, our clients also undergo addiction counseling to help them on the road to abstinence.  We added this Narcotic Replacement Therapy (NRT) to our services because we want all addicts to have a chance to survive and recover.  Many opiate addicts are motivated for recovery, but they can’t get past the opiate cravings that drag them back to using again.  We keep them in treatment.

Tarzana Treatment Centers in Los Angeles provides a full array of health care services including adult and youth alcohol and drug treatment.  We specialize in treatment for mental health and substance use disorders, and have two primary medical care clinics in the San Fernando Valley and Antelope Valley.  If you or a loved one needs help with alcohol dependencedrug addiction, or co-occurring mental health disorders, please call us now at 888-777-8565 or contact us here.

Telemedicine services are also available with online medical care, online mental health treatment, and online alcohol and drug treatment.

Southern California Locations for Alcohol and Drug Treatment
Tarzana Treatment Centers has locations all over Southern California in Los Angeles County. Other than our central location in Tarzana, we have facilities in Lancaster in the Antelope Valley, Long Beach, and in Northridge and Reseda in the San Fernando Valley.

Recovery Month 2010 Events

by James Heller 3. August 2010 14:06

Tarzana Treatment Centers in Los Angeles will participate in Recovery Month 2010 by planning and attending several events you may want to attend.  We will help the national recovery community to bring awareness to the public about the benefits of recovery from alcohol dependence and drug addiction.  Please join us in September for this celebration of hope and freedom.

Here are just a few of the events we will attend:

August 31, 9:30am           LA County Supervisors Proclamation at LA County Hall

September 7, 6:00pm       City of San Fernando Proclamation at Council Chambers

September 23, 6:00pm     Recovery Night at Dodger Stadium

September 28, 10:00am   Antelope Valley Rally and March for Recovery at Tarzana Treatment Centers

September 29, 10:00am   San Fernando Valley Rally and March for Recovery at Van Nuys Court Quad

We will plan and attend more events, so please bookmark this page and check back every day for updates.  If you or your organization would like to plan an event in your area, go to this page for information:
http://www.recoverymonth.gov/Community-Events/Event-Planning.aspx

Tarzana Treatment Centers in Los Angeles provides adult and youth alcohol and drug treatment.  We specialize in treatment for mental health and substance use disorders, and have two primary medical care clinics in the San Fernando Valley and Antelope Valley.  If you or a loved one needs help with alcohol dependence, drug addiction, or co-occurring mental health disorders, please call us now at 888-777-8565 or contact us here.

All of our services are also available via video conference or phone as part of our telehealth services.

Southern California Locations for Alcohol and Drug Treatment
Tarzana Treatment Centers has locations all over Southern California in Los Angeles County. Other than our central location in Tarzana, we have facilities in Lancaster in the Antelope Valley, Long Beach, and in Northridge and Reseda in the San Fernando Valley.

Alcohol Dependence and Drug Addiction -Tolerance

by James Heller 18. May 2010 13:48
Tolerance, as it relates to alcohol dependence and drug addiction, is often misunderstood by many in the general public.  In the manner that drug and alcohol tolerance functions, it can be a safety mechanism to the body and, at the same time, deadly.  This makes awareness of the subject critical for anyone who engages in alcohol abuse or drug abuse, as well as those in recovery.

It can easily be assumed that tolerance means that an individual can drink more alcohol without getting drunk, or handle drug use in a seemingly controlled manner.  With this assumption comes the belief that these “abilities” are an example of the natural differences that exist from one individual to another.  While this is partially true, the nature of alcohol and drug tolerance is much more complicated.

Alcohol tolerance is the example with which most people can relate.  Consider the amount of alcohol you need to drink before you feel the effects, or “buzzed”.  Let’s say this is 2 beers.  If you drink 2 beers every day, over time you will feel less of an effect.  If you want to feel the same effect, you must drink more alcohol.  The amount of alcohol needed for the same feeling will continue to increase as you add more alcohol.  

The same concept works with drugs.  Alcohol abuse or drug abuse can result from tolerance since individuals will chase that feeling by drinking or using more on each occasion.  If the cycle continues with regular daily alcohol or drug intake, the body can become physically dependent and alcoholism or drug addiction is the result.  

On this road to addiction that we just followed, the brain has protected the body from overdose, with tolerance, by adjusting to the higher levels of substance use.  This benefit of drug tolerance can become a dangerous consequence, though, for recovering individuals who relapse.  The addicted brain still needs a large amount of drugs for an effect, but the body returns to a lower tolerance of what is essentially a poison.

At the time of first use on a relapse, the brain will dictate the most recent amount of drugs used to get a desired effect.  If the formerly recovering addict is not careful, this amount can easily cause a drug overdose or even be fatal.  Many drug addicts are not aware of this fact, and will even ignore warnings from fellow drug users because they don’t realize the consequences they face.

While alcoholics are less likely to overdose on alcohol during first use on a relapse, they may experience what is known as a lack of tolerance.  At this point, a drunken feeling may result from only 1 drink.  Lack of tolerance can actually occur with anyone who drinks alcohol, but it is typically coupled with alcohol dependence.  Of course, that 1 drink will still not be enough to satisfy alcoholics and they can become a danger to themselves through inebriation and alcohol’s effect on the body.

This information is good to share with teens, friends in recovery, or anyone you may know who engages in alcohol abuse or drug abuse.  Too many see tolerance as a benefit both early in substance use and in addiction.  Tolerance is explained in effective alcohol and drug treatment as part of addiction education groups to prevent accidental overdoses among those who may relapse.  Bringing this awareness to the general public may save even more lives.

Tarzana Treatment Centers in Los Angeles provides youth alcohol and drug treatment and addiction education.  We specialize in treatment for mental health and substance use disorders, and have two primary medical care clinics in the San Fernando Valley and Antelope Valley.  If you or a loved one needs help with alcohol dependence, drug addiction, or co-occurring mental health disorders, please call us now at 888-777-8565 or contact us here.

Southern California Locations for Alcohol and Drug Treatment
Tarzana Treatment Centers has locations all over Southern California in Los Angeles County. Other than our central location in Tarzana, we have facilities in Lancaster in the Antelope Valley, Long Beach, and in Northridge and Reseda in the San Fernando Valley.

Tags:

Addiction Treatment | Adolescent Alcohol Abuse | Adolescent Alcohol Treatment | Adolescent Alcohol Treatment – Los Angeles | Adolescent Drug Abuse | Adolescent Drug Addiction | Adolescent Drug Treatment | Adolescent Drug Treatment – Los Angeles | Adolescent Heroin Abuse | Adolescent Prescription Drug Abuse | Adolescent Substance Abuse | Alcohol Abuse Facts | Alcohol and Drug Treatment | Alcohol Dependence | Alcohol Facts | Alcohol Rehab | Alcohol Tolerance | Alcohol Treatment | Alcohol Treatment - Los Angeles | Alcohol Withdrawal | Benzodiazepine Tolerance | Cocaine Addiction | College Alcohol Abuse | Community Healthcare | Community Involvement | Drug Abuse Facts | Drug Addiction | Drug Dependence | Drug Intervention | Drug Overdose | Drug Rehab | Drug Tolerance | Drug Treatment | Drug Treatment - Los Angeles | Drug Withdrawal | Drug Withdrawal Symptoms | Ecstasy | Family Alcoholism | Family Drug Addiction | Help With Alcohol | Help With Drugs | Heroin Treatment | Heroin Withdrawal | Integrated Behavioral Healthcare | Intervention | Learn About Addiction | Marijuana Addiction | Medical Detoxification | Methadone | Methamphetamine Addiction | Methamphetamine Treatment | Methamphetamines | Opiate Abuse | Opiate Addiction | Opiate Addiction Treatment | Opiate Tolerance | Opiate Treatment | Opiate Withdrawal | Opioid Abuse | Opioid Detox | Opioid Treatment | Opioid Withdrawal | Pain Killer Addiction | Pain Killer Treatment | Prescription Drug Abuse | Prescription Drug Addiction | Prescription Drug Overdose | Prescription Drug Tolerance | Prescription Drug Treatment | Prescription Drug Withdrawal | Relapse Issues | Relapse Prevention – Alcohol | Relapse Prevention – Drugs | Stimulant Addiction | Stimulant Withdrawal | Substance Abuse Treatment | Teen Alcohol Abuse | Teen Alcohol Treatment | Teen Drug Abuse | Teen Drug Addiction | Teen Drug Treatment | Teen Marijuana Abuse | Teen Prescription Drug Abuse | Teen Recovery | Youth Alcohol Abuse | Youth Alcohol Treatment | Youth Drug Abuse | Youth Drug Addiction | Youth Drug Treatment | Youth Marijuana Abuse | Youth Prescription Drug Abuse

Senior Alcohol Abuse - Damaging Effects

by James Heller 12. May 2010 15:07
Senior alcohol abuse is often more difficult to correct than with any other group in America.  By age 60, most individuals are set in their ways and don’t feel the need to change anything.  In fact, many seniors are aware of the risks they face with heavy drinking and continue seemingly without care.  Loved ones may feel helpless, but solutions exist.

About 40% of those over 60 say they drink alcohol, with almost one-third of them admitting to binge drinking and heavy drinking, or alcohol dependence.  These statistics come from a 2007 report at the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, Office of Applied Studies website.  This means that about 1 in 10 seniors at least binge drink on occasion, which can be very dangerous to their health and that of others.  

Many external changes happen with individuals when they reach age 60.  Retirement is imminent if it has not already occurred, friends begin to move away or pass away, and family members may even suggest a change of residence.  Worst of all, the mind and body begin to show signs of aging, meaning that doctor visits become common and more medications need to be taken.  All of these can be terribly stressful on anyone when they are grouped into a few short years.

Boredom, loneliness, and a sense of powerlessness can each lead anyone to drink alcohol.  Whether it is a time-filler or an escape from negative feelings doesn’t matter.  The end result is that it works and leads to earlier drinking times and less time outside the home.  Senior alcohol abuse may even be a purposeful celebration of the golden years.  The daily party begins with joy, but can quickly turn to injury or a fatality.

This can all be very harmful for seniors due to interactions with medications, a higher risk of falling, and aging major organs.  If alcohol dependence sets in, the effects on the body and brain are more detrimental to seniors than anyone else.  The celebrators, in freedom, usually drive under the influence.  Yet most seniors who abuse alcohol either hide it or justify it, and accept the risks.

Family members who see the alcohol abuse will often accept the behavior as a rite of passage.  Considering the years they have lived, why would a loved one deny what seems well deserved? And if nobody gets hurt, all is okay.  That is, until somebody gets hurt or health problems develop.  Some seniors will stop the behavior at this point, but most will continue to drink heavily and probably more.

There are 2 things that loved ones can do at this point.  The first is to strongly suggest alcohol detox and alcohol treatment.  But most people in their 60’s today will see that as a sign of weakness and refuse, and family members generally won’t force the issue.  Doing so may get the elderly alcoholic into treatment, but he or she will only benefit if self-motivated.  So keep suggesting, with love, and let them make the decision.

Second, you can set boundaries and stick to them.  If they refuse to quit drinking or cut down, suggest accompanying them to the doctor so you can discuss medication interactions.  Let them know you understand that they are not concerned with their own health, but you are concerned with the health of others including yourself and younger members of the family.  It may be hard, but you must be firm, with love, and continue to suggest alcohol treatment.

To the younger generations, seniors who refuse to change these behaviors seem stubborn.  However, like any other individual who engages in alcohol abuse, the bottom line is that they are escaping from emotions.  Instead of arguing and treating them like children, it is best to discuss feelings as much as possible.  Avoid forcing the issue of senior alcohol treatment, and use gentle, loving nudges.

Tarzana Treatment Centers in Los Angeles provides alcohol and drug treatment for seniors in a culturally sensitive manner.  We specialize in treatment for mental health and substance use disorders, and have two primary medical care clinics in the San Fernando Valley and Antelope Valley.  If you or a loved one needs help with alcohol dependence, drug addiction, or co-occurring mental health disorders, please call us now at 888-777-8565 or contact us here.

Southern California Locations for Alcohol and Drug Treatment
Tarzana Treatment Centers has locations all over Southern California in Los Angeles County. Other than our central location in Tarzana, we have facilities in Lancaster in the Antelope Valley, Long Beach, and in Northridge and Reseda in the San Fernando Valley.