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California Health Care – Medi-Cal and the Affordable Care Act (ACA)

by James Heller 25. September 2012 08:42
When provisions of the federal Affordable Care Act (ACA) go into effect in 2014, Medi-Cal will begin covering about 1.5 million new beneficiaries in California alone.  In addition, the Mental Health Parity and Addiction Equity Act of 2008 will more-likely be enforced due to the ACA.  This means that Medi-Cal will be required to cover many more individuals who need mental health care and substance use disorder treatment.  
 
 
These are important changes that, if handled properly, can benefit a large number of California citizens who have gone without vital mental health treatment due to lack of financial ability.  Tarzana Treatment Centers is proud to have our very own President, Albert Senella, taking a lead position to help the State organize what could be a very complicated situation.  His decades of health care and funding experience has given him a unique perspective of the changes that need to take place.

The California Healthline article, “Mental Health, Substance Abuse Treatment Changing”, details of the challenges and spells out the possible solutions.  It is an interesting look at differing approaches the State, treatment facilities, and professional organizations are taking to address health care funding.  We hope you will take a few minutes to become educated on this important topic.



Tarzana Treatment Centers in Los Angeles provides a full array of health care services including adult and youth alcohol and drug treatment.  We specialize in treatment for mental health and substance use disorders, and have two primary medical care clinics in the San Fernando Valley and Antelope Valley and specialized services for HIV/AIDS care.  If you or a loved one needs help with alcohol dependencedrug addiction, or co-occurring mental health disorders or from other services we offer, please call us now at 888-777-8565 or contact us using our secure contact form.

Telemedicine services are also available with online medical care, online mental health treatment, and online alcohol and drug treatment.

Southern California Locations for Alcohol and Drug Treatment
Tarzana Treatment Centers has locations all over Southern California in Los Angeles County. Other than our central location in Tarzana, we have facilities in Lancaster in the Antelope Valley, Long Beach, and in Northridge and Reseda in the San Fernando Valley.

Alcohol and Drug Treatment for the Incarcerated

by James Heller 29. October 2009 11:03
The state of California is still struggling with what to do about alcohol and drug treatment for the incarcerated.  It makes sense when the facts point to success in rehabilitating those who commit crimes and have problems with alcoholism or drug addiction.  Programs could be improved, but the fact that officials see worth in alcohol and drug treatment is a good sign.

Some may say that at this point in California’s history, we take what we can get.  But in this case we know that these programs actually save money for California.  When we treat the problem of alcohol dependence and drug addiction in these individuals, the drain they once placed on the economy goes away and they contribute to society.

Healthcare, incarceration and other costs have been reduced through some of these programs as much as 5 to 1 over necessary treatment costs.  This is not big news to California legislators and, in fact, was predicted when treatment instead of incarceration began.  So to reduce funding for these programs would be to go in the wrong direction.

State Legislators need to be told by the public that we want these programs because they not only work, but they also have a positive effect on the economy.  It is not time to be satisfied with what we have.  The fact that State officials see the value in these programs means they will respond to contact from the public.  You may find your representatives’ contact information here.

The following excerpt is from an article in Alcoholism and Drug Abuse Weekly.  This is a fine journal for learning about alcohol dependence and drug addiction.  The full article offers some detailed insight into current action in the California State budget as it relates to alcohol and drug treatment for the incarcerated.

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The return to custody rate for offenders completing both in-prison and community-based treatment in fiscal year 2005-2006, the years covered by the report, was 21.9 percent, compared to 39.9 percent for all offenders one year after parole.  Two years after parole, the recidivism rate was 35.3 percent for offenders who participated in both kinds of treatment, compared to 54.2 percent for all offenders.

For female offenders, treatment worked particularly well. One year after parole, only 8.8 percent of female offenders completing both kinds of treatment were returned to custody, compared to 30.1 percent of all female offenders. After two years, 16.5 percent of women receiving treatment had been returned to prison, compared to 43.7 percent of all female offenders.

For male offenders, 25.4 percent of those who had received both kinds of treatment were returned to custody one year later, compared to 41.2 percent of all male offenders. Two years after parole, the return-to-custody rate was 40.4 percent for men who received both kinds of treatment, compared to 55.6 percent of all male offenders.

-- Source: http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/journal/110575473/home --

Tarzana Treatment Centers in Los Angeles provides court-related services as part of our commitment to integrated behavioral healthcare in alcohol and drug treatment.  If you or a loved one needs help with alcohol abuse or drug addiction, please call us now at 888-777-8565 or contact us here.

Southern California Locations for Alcohol and Drug Treatment
Tarzana Treatment Centers has locations all over Southern California in Los Angeles County. Other than our central location in Tarzana, we have facilities in Lancaster in the Antelope Valley, Long Beach, and in Northridge and Reseda in the San Fernando Valley.

Alcohol and Drug Treatment Funding Petition

by James Heller 18. August 2009 07:14
Tarzana Treatment Centers in Los Angeles continues the effort to keep alcohol and drug treatment services alive in California for the less fortunate.  We support the use of petitions and letters to keep State Representatives aware of voters’ wishes.  And we urge you to continue signing petitions and sending letters until our state leaders make a commitment to alcoholism and drug addiction treatment funding.

Change.org has posted a petition and letter on their website.  Here is the link:
http://www.change.org/actions/view/save_substance_abuse_treatment_in_california

The goal for the petition is 5,000 signatures.  By posting the link on our website, we hope that all of our visitors, their friends, and their families, will make this goal possible.  The suggested letter can be copied and pasted into an email to your State Legislators and the Governor.

So please sign the petition and send a few letters, and get others to do the same.  If you do not know how to contact your representatives, go to this link:
http://www.leginfo.ca.gov/yourleg.html

The issue of funding for alcohol and drug treatment in California is too important to sit back and see what happens.  Action must be taken by all who care.  It is also important to note that these programs actually bring a net savings to the California budget.

More details can be found on our website blog California Budget Issues category.  Change.org also posted the summary below.

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Substance abuse treatment and prevention is underfunded.  We are facing the elimination of Proposition 36 (The Substance Abuse and Crime Prevention Act 2000) this year.  This historic act was passed overwhelmingly by the voters of California.  It provided for treatment instead of incarceration for thousands of Californians and it has proven to be successful and cost effective.  Treatment is an effective way of reducing crime, it costs less to treat someone than it does to send them to jail or prison; it produces clean and sober individuals who then become taxpaying citizens; it reduces health care and public assistance costs.  For every dollar invested in treatment we save $7.  Most important it saves lives, families and communities from the devastation of drug abuse and alcoholism.  Estimates are that one in ten people suffer from alcoholism or an addiction and that every addict affects 10 others directly.  By offering treatment we help reduce the negative effects of this disease and its' effect on society.

-- Source: http://www.change.org/actions/view/save_substance_abuse_treatment_in_california --

Tarzana Treatment Centers in Los Angeles makes a daily effort to find treatment news articles that we can share with our readers in the alcohol and drug treatment community.  The external content was found among other articles of equal informational and educational quality.

Southern California Locations for Alcohol and Drug Treatment
Tarzana Treatment Centers has locations all over Southern California in Los Angeles County. Other than our central location in Tarzana, we have facilities in Lancaster in the Antelope Valley, Long Beach, and in Northridge and Reseda in the San Fernando Valley.

Healthcare Can Save With Alcohol and Drug Treatment

by James Heller 29. July 2009 07:21
While the state of California and the United States governments are looking for ways to reduce health care costs, they should consider alcohol and drug treatment as a helpful measure.  The savings that result from treating alcoholism and drug addiction are significant and wide spread.  When individuals stop alcohol and drug abuse, medical conditions tend to improve or disappear.

Alcohol’s effects on the body, for example, touch every major organ.  So an individual with a heart condition, or even a skin condition, complicates it with continued alcohol abuse or dependence.  When alcohol is removed from the body, it has a better opportunity to heal.  And the alcohol free patient is more likely to follow doctor’s orders.

Drug addiction can cause an array of long-term medical problems.  It also results in many 911 calls and emergency room visits for drug overdoses.  These are costly, as most drug addicts can’t afford to pay for these services.  When drug addiction ceases for individuals, the potential for lower emergency medical costs improves.

Funding alcohol and drug treatment will save these costs.  A study has been posted on www.treatmentgap.org that explains the benefits that it would have on healthcare and the economy.  The section below details findings in California.  The full article gives more examples and offers very convincing data.

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California: Savings from Addiction Treatment in Health Care Costs

In 2000 researcher Constance Weisner and others studied the overall medical costs of a group of men at an outpatient Kaiser Permanente addiction treatment program in Sacramento, Calif.  They studied the men 18 months before and after they began an outpatient chemical dependency recovery program.  The cost savings were startling:

  • Total medical costs declined 26 percent.
  • Inpatient health care costs declined 35 percent.
  • Emergency room costs declined 39 percent.

“As in previous studies on medical offset, we observed that a group of adult, chemical dependency (CD) patients have substantially higher utilization of medical services and medical costs prior to entry in treatment when compared to other, non-CD, members who are similar in terms of age, gender and length of enrollment,” the researchers wrote.

“We found that the most significant reductions were observed in inpatient use and likelihood of ER use, but other measures (e.g., inpatient days and number of ER visits) also showed substantial decreases.”

-- Source: http://www.soros.org/initiatives/treatmentgap/articles_publications/publications/paper1_20090714/paper1_20090714.pdf --

Tarzana Treatment Centers in Los Angeles makes a daily effort to find treatment news articles that we can share with our readers in the alcohol and drug treatment community.  The external content was found among other articles of equal informational and educational quality.

Southern California Locations for Alcohol and Drug Treatment
Tarzana Treatment Centers has locations all over Southern California in Los Angeles County and Orange County. Other than our central location in Tarzana, we have facilities in Lancaster in the Antelope Valley, Long Beach, in Northridge and Reseda in the San Fernando Valley, and in Santa Ana.

California Budget Update - Alcohol and Drug Treatment

by James Heller 16. July 2009 12:15
Looking at news reports and the California Budget Committee’s website, it is difficult to get information on the status of funding for alcohol and drug treatment through Prop 36, OTP, and Drug Medi-Cal.  Of course nothing will be certain until the California Legislature approves the new budget and the governor signs it.  So, for now, contacting your representatives and the Budget Committee with your wishes is important.

The latest published information can be rather confusing to those who are unfamiliar with legal and political jargon.  As of June 30th, it looks like alcohol and drug treatment programs will continue to be funded, but drastically cut according to a State Senate report.  This is promising news, but legislators need to be informed that more funding for these programs means greater cost savings in other areas of the budget.

Drug Medi-Cal has proven to reduce healthcare costs that result from drug use.  Cutting funding for this program will impact many low-income individuals.  Instead of getting treatment for the source of their health problems, they will eventually need treatment for problems that develop due to drug addiction.  Maintained funding for Drug Medi-Cal can mean a net savings on the state budget.

Citizens Contacting California Legislators to date has appeared to convince them that Prop 36 and Offender Treatment Programs (OTP) need to be funded.  However, funding for the very successful Prop 36 is proposed to be slashed to a fraction of last year’s budget.  There is no excuse to decrease funding on either of these programs.

Prop 36, for example, was mandated by voters in 2000 to send non-violent drug offenders to alcohol or drug treatment rather than incarcerate them.  Low funding will mean that these offenders will be sentenced to treatment, but might need to wait to enter alcohol and drug treatment.  This places them at risk for relapse and probable incarceration, raising corrections costs in California.

Prop 36 pays for itself and actually returns $2.50 to California for every dollar spent.  OTP, along with suggested corrections and parole reforms, will also decrease the budget deficit through cost savings in state facilities.  Legislators seem to be heading in the direction of corrections and parole reforms that will make these savings a reality.  They only need a little more convincing.

If you have not contacted your California Assemblymember or State Senator, please do so now and tell them you want full funding for programs that work and save money.  You can find your representatives’ contact information here.

If you have already contacted them, do it again.  The California Legislature needs to know how important it is to voters that these successful programs continue unimpeded.

The information below is from a report released on June 30th, before California was forced to issue IOUs to contractors.  The full report details most of the budget items under consideration.

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_ Alcohol and Drug Programs: Reduces funding by $90 million for Proposition 36 programs that provide treatment to substance abuse offenders, but continues to fund treatment under the Offender Treatment Program (OTP).  Provides federal Byrne funds of approximately $60 million to supplement OTP services.

Reduces, by 10 percent, the rates paid to Drug Medi-Cal providers for a General Fund savings of $8.8 million.

CORRECTIONS AND JUDICIARY
Overall in Corrections: Achieves $1.2 billion in savings (somewhat less than the Governor’s amount). Includes prison and parole reforms (including eliminating parole for low-risk offenders, increasing supervision for higher risk parolees, bolstering probation supervision, implementing re-entry courts); modification to sentencing laws for “wobblers” (fewer changes than proposed by the Governor); and alternative custody options.
Reduces funds for less effective rehabilitation programs (but not elimination, as proposed by the Governor), and includes unallocated reductions to the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation, including to headquarters administration (using more realistic assumptions than the Governor’s).

-- Source: http://www.sen.ca.gov/budget/2009conf/6292009ConfComHighlights.pdf --

Tarzana Treatment Centers in Los Angeles makes a daily effort to find treatment news articles that we can share with our readers in the alcohol and drug treatment community.  The external content was found among other articles of equal informational and educational quality.

Southern California Locations for Alcohol and Drug Treatment
Tarzana Treatment Centers has locations all over Southern California in Los Angeles County and Orange County. Other than our central location in Tarzana, we have facilities in Lancaster in the Antelope Valley, Long Beach, in Northridge and Reseda in the San Fernando Valley, and in Santa Ana.

Big Public Support for Alcohol and Drug Treatment in Healthcare Reform

by James Heller 23. June 2009 11:56
As the US Federal Government considers healthcare reform, the highest priorities need to be where the public wants it the most.

The poll below shows that people strongly favor including alcohol and drug treatment coverage under the new plan.  It appears that more and more people understand that by providing treatment for alcohol dependence and drug addiction, costs for healthcare, incarceration, and crime will decrease.

California legislators and the governor should also take note of these figures.

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Poll: Open Society Institute/Lake Research Partners
June 2009
OSI

This study, sponsored by the Open Society Institute, examines attitudes toward the accessibility and affordability of alcohol and drug addiction treatment for the many Americans who need these services, including veterans. The poll shows that Americans of all walks of life are personally touched by addiction, and half of them say they could not afford treatment if they or a family member needed it.

Key findings include:

  • Three-quarters of Americans (76%) know someone personally who has been addicted to alcohol or drugs. Personal experience with addiction spans all demographic groups.
  • Half of Americans (49%) do not think they would be able to afford the costs of treatment if they or a family member needed it. This concern about affordability is highest among Americans with incomes under $50,000 (67% say they would not be able to afford treatment).
  • Three-quarters (75%) of Americans are concerned that people who are addicted to alcohol or drugs may not be able to get treatment because they lack insurance coverage or cannot afford it.
  • Nearly three-quarters (73%) support including alcohol and drug addiction treatment as part of national health care reform to make it more accessible and affordable. This support cuts across all demographic groups.

-- Source: http://www.soros.org/initiatives/treatmentgap/research/poll_20090616 --

Southern California Locations for Alcohol and Drug Treatment
Tarzana Treatment Centers has locations all over Southern California in Los Angeles County and Orange County. Other than our central location in Tarzana, we have facilities in Lancaster in the Antelope Valley, Long Beach, in Northridge and Reseda in the San Fernando Valley, and in Santa Ana.

Proposed Alcohol Fee Is Good For The California Economy

by James Heller 5. June 2009 10:07
A very important piece of legislation is currently being considered by the California State Assembly that places a fee on alcohol drinks.  Tarzana Treatment Centers supports the position paper below by the Marin Institute.  This is a fair and reasonable fee that will help those in need of alcohol and drug treatment and improve the California economy.  Please find your California State Representatives here and contact them expressing your support for AB 1019.

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Marin Institute

ASK YOUR LEGISLATOR TO SUPPORT AB 1019

Alcohol Related Services Act of 2009

HELP SOLVE THE BUDGET CRISES with $1.44 billion In ALCOHOL FEES


The Alcohol Related Services Act (AB 1019) is a bill authored by Assembly Member Jim Beall (D - San Jose). The legislation establishes the Alcohol-Related Services Program (ARS Program) within the California Department of Alcohol and Drug Programs.

WHY AN ALCOHOL FEE?

  • Published research has shown that alcohol causes more than $38 billion in harm annually.  Of this amount, approximately $8 billion is paid for by the California government (by both state and county agencies).
  • The ARS program is specifically designed to mitigate the enormous social and economic harm caused by alcohol sales in California. The bill would assess a mitigation fee (not a tax) on spirits, wine and beer, equivalent to 10 cents a drink for beer, wine, and all spirits.
  • Because the bill creates a fee program, only a majority vote of both houses is required, with the Governor’s signature. This mitigation fee, or charge for harm, will generate approximately $1.4 billion to pay for alcohol-related services in California.
  • Currently, the alcohol industry bears no economic responsibility for the problems its products cause. California lags in charging for alcohol harm compared to the progress made in tobacco control over the last 40 years. Most of the fees will be paid by the heaviest alcohol producers, which are foreign corporations such as Anheuser-Busch InBev, SAB Miller, and Diageo.

WHAT WILL THE FEE PAY FOR?

The ARS Program consists of five equally funded alcohol-related component services to mitigate the harm of alcohol sales in the following categories.

  1. Treatment and Recovery
  2. Emergency Room and Trauma
  3. Hospitalization and Rehabilitation
  4. Criminal Justice and Enforcement
  5. Prevention, Education, and Research

The Department of Alcohol and Drug Programs will hold public hearings and create guidelines for component services through grants or contracts within four months of the bill’s passage.  New or existing programs will be funded.

For Instance, the ADP might create a $300 million annual program for hospitals to be reimbursed for uncompensated care to indigent people for alcohol-related emergency room admissions.  Many treatment and recovery programs will be fully funded.  Criteria of need, effectiveness and best practices will be used by ADP as guidance in creating service components.

-- Source: http://www.marininstitute.org/site/images/stories/pdfs/ab1019.pdf --

Tarzana Treatment Centers in Los Angeles makes a daily effort to find treatment news articles that we can share with our readers in the alcohol and drug treatment community.  The external content was found among other articles of equal informational and educational quality.

Southern California Locations for Alcohol and Drug Treatment
Tarzana Treatment Centers has locations all over Southern California in Los Angeles County and Orange County. Other than our central location in Tarzana, we have facilities in Lancaster in the Antelope Valley, Long Beach, in Northridge and Reseda in the San Fernando Valley, and in Santa Ana.

An Open Letter to Governor Schwarzenegger and California Legislators

by James Heller 4. June 2009 10:39
Tarzana Treatment Centers urges you to convey your support for the following:

1. Reject the Governor’s May revision proposals to eliminate Proposition 36 (Prop 36) and the Offender Treatment Program (OTP), to cut Drug Medi-Cal by 10%, to cut rehabilitation services in the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR), and to cut CalWorks substance abuse services.

The Prop 36 program has saved money for the state in incarceration costs and has decreased crime rates statewide.  If Prop 36 funds become unavailable, alcohol and drug treatment will also be unavailable, leaving diverted offenders without a choice but to return to a life of alcohol, drugs, and crime.

In addition, Prop 36 is a large part of the Maintenance of Effort required to receive federal SAPT block grant funds.  Losing this funding could place an additional burden on the state, as well as the alcohol and drug treatment programs in California.  Prop 36 has proven to be a model for several other states in the nation, so we need to take pride in its success and nurture it.

2. Adopt the Legislative Analyst Recommendation to designate a portion of Byrne-JAG funds for treatment instead of arresting low level drug offenders.  

OTP should be partially funded with Byrne-JAG funds and partially with General Funds.  The Legislative Analyst is recommending $50 million for Prop. 36.  We support this recommendation with an additional $10 million for probation services.  With this, low-level drug possession offenders could stay out of prison and off parole.  This would save the state an estimated $500 million to $1 billion on the incarceration side and $135 million on the parole side.

3.  Adopt Legislative Analyst recommendations regarding CDCR and parole reform.  

CDCR should end the practice of violating parole for technical violations that send parolee drug offenders back to prison instead of into treatment. They should also stop parole violations while parolees are in treatment and assure that parole officers follow the protocols/check list for rescinding parole and instead follow alternative sanctions protocols.  A meaningful portion of the cost savings realized should be allocated to treatment.

4. Expand community post incarceration aftercare programs established under SB 1453, (Speier) Chapter 875, Statutes of 2006.  

This program guarantees community treatment for individuals who participate in in-custody treatment.  Those who complete treatment would have their parole ended. CDCR should utilize the current capacity in the SASCA system to expand this program.  

5. Adopt an increase of $0.10 per drink fee on alcohol beverages.  

The tax/fee on alcohol has not been increased since 1991.  According to the Marin Institute, increasing the alcohol fee by $0.10 a drink for alcoholic beverages (beer, wine and hard liquor) will yield almost $1.47 billion annually.

California voters will favor this fee.  A recent Public Policy Institute poll showed that 86% of likely voters in California support a fee on alcoholic drinks.  Democrats, Republicans, and Independents all agree that this is a good fee because it is reasonable, fair, and will result in cost savings and help boost the economy.  

In addressing the fiscal crisis, the legislature has the opportunity to scale down spending in ways that do not sow the seeds of next year’s budget problem.  Considering the nexus between substance abuse and the law, justice and correctional systems, we believe there are ways to make fiscally responsible reductions in programs while not simultaneously creating additional burdens for systems operating with diminished resources.  

The Governor has proposed cuts to California’s alcohol and drug treatment services that have not been given enough consideration.  As budget items are being scrutinized for merit, please take into account that with a proven track record in cost savings of up to $2 for every $1 spent, alcohol and drug treatment should not only be fully funded, but expansion should also be considered.  

California needs a long term solution. Cuts proposed by the Governor are short term and will result in long term increased costs at a rate of no less than $2.5 for every dollar cut.  

By taking these actions the state can achieve the needed cuts in general fund spending, create new revenues, use new revenues to fully fund these vital services and still have additional new revenues to help fund other needed health care services like HIV/AIDS, trauma centers, etc.

Alcohol and Drug Treatment for The Incarcerated

by James Heller 3. June 2009 12:12
One of the reasons we incarcerate those who commit crimes is to rehabilitate them.  The US justice system is supposed to help these individuals become civil members of society.  Since alcohol or drug use is involved in most crimes that result in incarceration, though, you would think that alcohol and drug treatment would be a key factor in their rehabilitation.  Unfortunately, that’s not the case for most of them.

A couple of scenarios can help explain why alcohol and drug treatment is needed for the incarcerated.  First, there is the alcoholic or drug addict who committed a crime while under the influence.  The second group consists of alcohol and drug abusers who live a life of crime and have been incarcerated several times.

Alcohol dependence and drug addiction can cause the sufferer to do things they normally wouldn’t.  This can be due to blackouts or desperation for a “fix”, among other reasons.  When the crime committed is serious enough to warrant incarceration, it stands to reason that treatment should be provided before they are released.  

These are not career criminals, but people who suffer from a disease that needs to be treated.  Probation for this group is counter-intuitive.  Follow-up outpatient alcohol or drug treatment makes better sense.  The problem is alcohol dependence or drug addiction, and not crime.  So the solution is to fix the primary problems of alcoholism or drug addiction that resulted in the crime.

Many incarcerated individuals know of no other way to survive than to commit crimes due to life circumstances.  They are always in and out of jails and prisons, and tend to use alcohol or drugs to mask inner feelings that motivate their life of crime.  The justice system would make great strides in solving this ongoing problem by providing alcohol and drug treatment during incarceration.

Alcohol and drug treatment gives sufferers a sense of hope that life can be lived not only without alcohol and drugs, but also as productive members of society.  For the incarcerated, the treatment experience can be powerful when they relate life experiences with one another.  The hope generated by treatment during incarceration can help many “career criminals” change the course of their lives.

Time served in a jails and prisons does nothing for anyone if they don’t learn how to change their lives upon release into society.  Even those with the best intentions of “going straight”, not knowing how, are at risk of returning to a life of crime.  So continued outpatient or even residential alcohol and drug treatment during probation can help to prevent a return to damaging lifestyles.

The National Institute on Drug Abuse reported on the lack of treatment available to incarcerated individuals.  An excerpt is provided below.  Revolving doors at jails and prisons don’t need to exist when we have solutions like alcohol and drug treatment.  And in tough economic times, it’s nice to know that making these changes will save money.

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Effective Treatment Is Not Widely Available

Less than 10 percent of adults and about 20 percent of adolescents with substance abuse problems in the Nation's jails, prisons, and probation programs can receive treatment on a given day, according to the National Criminal Justice Treatment Practices Survey (NCJTPS). Although 65 percent of adult facilities report that they offer substance abuse treatment, the number of people who can participate in these programs is often severely limited.

These findings further reveal the scope of the problem highlighted by previous research indicating that the most frequently provided services for adults and adolescents—substance abuse education and low-intensity group therapy (less than 4 hours a week)—are not likely to help offenders change their behavior. The survey also disclosed that only 40 percent of adult facilities and 29 percent of juvenile facilities reported having full-time personnel to provide drug abuse therapy.

-- Source: http://www.nida.nih.gov/NIDA_notes/NNvol22N3/nidaatwork.html#insert

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Southern California Locations for Alcohol and Drug Treatment
Tarzana Treatment Centers has locations all over Southern California in Los Angeles County and Orange County. Other than our central location in Tarzana, we have facilities in Lancaster in the Antelope Valley, Long Beach, in Northridge and Reseda in the San Fernando Valley, and in Santa Ana.