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College Alcohol Consumption Rises with Low Prices

by James Heller 9. November 2009 15:08
As if a study was needed, San Diego State University Center for Alcohol and Drug Studies has learned that college students drink more alcoholic beverages when they are priced lower.  While not everyone will engage in alcohol abuse on a regular basis just because it is cheap, this study provides an opportunity to explain one aspect of alcoholism.

Alcoholism is marked by the tendency of one to continue with heavy alcohol consumption in the face of resulting problems.  This is a loose clinical definition that can bring more questions than answers to the non-alcoholic.  To understand, alcoholics in recovery define the disease in different ways to help them, as well as others.

One that is clear goes as follows: Social drinkers stop drinking when they begin to feel “tipsy”, but an alcoholic is just getting started drinking with that feeling.  It means that once alcoholics start drinking, the desire is to continue for as long as they can pay for it or remain conscious.

Alcoholics will fit as many drinks as they can into their budgets while social drinkers can simply enjoy one drink.  Knowing that their dollars need to be stretched well, alcoholics will by beer and drink specials.  It is a matter of forethought when planning a night, or day, of drinking.

The study can be considered supportive of this definition.  College students typically have tight budgets to work with, so alcohol consumption can only be relative to the amount of money they have.  An alcoholic with $5.00 would choose five $1.00 beers over the one $5.00 cocktail that the non-alcoholic would buy.

Planning ahead for a drinking binge is a sign of alcohol obsession, even if it is just a budget consideration.  Social drinkers can take it or leave it.  Alcoholics need to know that they will get past the “tipsy” point.

An article about this study has been posted by the Addiction Technology Transfer Center.  An excerpt is below, followed by a link to the full article.  While the study may seem to show obvious results at first glance, the data is actually very interesting.

-- Begin external content –

“It may seem intuitive that cheaper alcohol can lead to higher intoxication levels and related consequences – such as fighting, drunk driving, sexual victimization, injury, even death – especially among the vulnerable college student population,” said Ryan J. O’Mara, a graduate research fellow at the University of Florida and corresponding author for the study.  “Nonetheless, ‘drink specials’ and other alcohol discounts and promotions remain a common feature of college bars in campus communities in the United States.  This study’s results challenge assertions sometimes made by the management of these establishments that drink discounts are innocuous marketing practices intended only to attract customers to better bargains than those provided elsewhere.”

“What makes this study unique,” added John D. Clapp, professor and director of the San Diego State University Center for Alcohol and Drug Studies, “is that it was one of the first to examine this relationship at the bar-patron level using methods that carefully examined price – that is, what people actually spent – and biologically measured intoxication.”

 -- Source: http://www.attcnetwork.org/explore/priorityareas/science/tools/asmeDetails.asp?ID=630 –

Tarzana Treatment Centers in Los Angeles provides alcohol detox as part of our commitment to integrated behavioral healthcare in alcohol and drug treatment.  If you or a loved one needs help with alcohol dependence, please call us now at 888-777-8565 or contact us here.

Southern California Locations for Alcohol and Drug Treatment
Tarzana Treatment Centers has locations all over Southern California in Los Angeles County. Other than our central location in Tarzana, we have facilities in Lancaster in the Antelope Valley, Long Beach, and in Northridge and Reseda in the San Fernando Valley.

Understanding Alcoholism and Drug Addiction - Denial

by James Heller 29. October 2009 10:53
People have a hard time understanding why loved ones suffering from alcohol dependence or drug addiction wait so long to enter alcohol and drug treatment.  A major reason for this is denial of reality.  As bad as things look to the outsider, alcoholics and drug addicts just don’t see it.

Denial should not be compared to a blindfold.  It’s more like blinders on a racehorse.  Alcoholics and drug addicts are well aware of the problems they face in life.  But they are incapable of accepting the consequences they suffer because alcohol and drugs are an important part of their lives.  As far as they are concerned, alcohol or drugs are a solution and far from a problem.

It comes from a belief that absent their calming substance things would be much worse, not better.  When a thought that problems stem from alcohol or drugs begin to enter their minds, it is quickly dismissed as preposterous.  There is a tunnel vision that temporarily pushes these thoughts out of sight along with all of the problems that need to be solved.

Even deeper in their psyche is an incapability to deal with emotions.  Denial protects alcoholics and addicts from feelings.  When they are confronted by a loved one, they will run to the comfort of alcohol or drugs to “clear their heads”.  The escape from emotions is a comfort.  In fact, it is usually the only comfort they have.  

This cycle is never-ending because alcohol and drugs are both the solution and problem for the alcoholic and addict.  But the solution illusion always wins in their minds.  Thus, they will not seek alcohol and drug treatment until problems are insurmountable or the family calls for an intervention.

Sadly, it takes a shock to the system to drag the alcoholic and drug addict into reality.  Once denial is shattered they may feel lost, so care must be taken to avoid provoking them back to denial.  The best bet is to be firm with the shock, but have loving arms to catch them when they fall.  Then immediately contact an alcohol and drug treatment center.

Drug-addiction.com, an informative website, posted an article a few years back that offers a glimpse at the problem of denial with the disease.  The portion excerpted below shows pertinent statistics, and the full article offers some additional insight.

-- Begin external content --

According to the results of the survey, of the 5.0 million people who needed but did not receive treatment in 2001, an estimated 377,000 reported that they felt they needed treatment for their drug problem. This includes an estimated 101,000 who reported that they made an effort but were unable to get treatment and 276,000 who reported making no effort to get treatment.

"We have a large and growing denial gap when it comes to drug abuse and dependency in this country," said John Walters, Director of National Drug Control Policy. "We have a responsibility--as family members, employers, physicians, educators, religious leaders, neighbors, colleagues, and friends--to reach out to help these people. We must find ways to lead them back to drug free lives. And the earlier we reach them, the greater will be our likelihood of success."

-- Source: http://www.drug-addiction.com/drugs_and_denial.htm --

Tarzana Treatment Centers in Los Angeles can help with intervention as part of our commitment to integrated behavioral healthcare in alcohol and drug treatment.  If you or a loved one needs help with alcoholism or drug addiction, please call us now at 888-777-8565 or contact us here.

Southern California Locations for Alcohol and Drug Treatment
Tarzana Treatment Centers has locations all over Southern California in Los Angeles County. Other than our central location in Tarzana, we have facilities in Lancaster in the Antelope Valley, Long Beach, and in Northridge and Reseda in the San Fernando Valley.

Antisocial Behavior

by James Heller 15. October 2009 14:53
Adolescent alcohol abuse can mark the beginning of many future problems.  Even if the youth avoids later alcohol dependence and abuse problems, there are still behavioral issues that can affect their social lives.  Antisocial behavior is one of these issues.

Alcohol abuse and dependence hinders the ability to learn in the development process.  When adolescents use alcohol in the face of typical life problems like break-ups, bad grades or losing a big game, they essentially block the brain from learning how to deal with it.  So later in life they will either act out in public or isolate completely.

Antisocial behavior is a negative answer to fears individuals have about social situations.  These behaviors can be in the form of a publicly disruptive display or, on the other hand, hiding in isolation away from others.  Either way the behavior inhibits social interaction and personal growth.

While antisocial behavior is more pronounced with repetitive adolescent alcohol abuse, even occasional binge drinking could cause problems.  This is because the masking of feelings with alcohol enters the psyche and has a permanent effect.  So the frustration of dealing with those feelings later in life can drive them to isolate or act out.

The National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism has released an alert that is a comprehensive look at the influence of alcohol on development.  A portion of the alert is below, followed by a link to the document.

-- Begin external content –

Across multiple studies, there seems to be a strong relationship between drinking in later adolescence and in early adulthood. Research also shows that people who drink heavily in late adolescence are more likely than others to be diagnosed with an AUD later in life. In addition, alcohol use in late adolescence is associated with a number of other serious problems in adulthood, including drug dependence, antisocial behavior, and depression, although evidence of this latter association has been inconsistent.

-- Source: http://pubs.niaaa.nih.gov/publications/AA78/AA78.pdf --

Tarzana Treatment Centers in Los Angeles provides youth alcohol and drug treatment.  We also staff mental health professionals as part of our commitment to integrated behavioral healthcare.  If you or a loved one needs help for alcohol abuse, please call us now at 888-777-8565 or contact us here.

Southern California Locations for Alcohol and Drug Treatment
Tarzana Treatment Centers has locations all over Southern California in Los Angeles County. Other than our central location in Tarzana, we have facilities in Lancaster in the Antelope Valley, Long Beach, and in Northridge and Reseda in the San Fernando Valley.

Facts About Alcohol

by James Heller 30. September 2009 13:49
Alcohol is created by fermenting grains, fruits, or vegetables. Fermentation is a chemical process that uses yeast or bacteria to change the sugars in the food into alcohol. Alcohol has various different forms and can be used for many different reasons.

The type of alcohol that people consume is ethanol alcohol. Ethanol alcohol is a psychoactive drug and psychotropic substance which primarily affects the central nervous system. Alcohol acts upon the central nervous system where it alters brain function thus resulting in temporary changes in behavior, mood, consciousness and perception. Aside from being a psychoactive drug, alcohol is also a sedative.

Alcohol is absorbed through a person’s stomach. After the alcohol enters the bloodstream it is distributed to all of the body’s tissues and goes directly to the spinal cord and brain. According to The Partnership for a Drug-Free America website, the effects of alcohol are dependent on a variety of factors, including a person’s size, weight, age, sex, and the amount of food and alcohol consumed.

            Short term effects of alcohol include the following:

  • Impairs a person’s judgment and coordination required to drive a car or operate machinery
  • Dizziness
  • Talkativeness
  • Slurred speech
  • Problems sleeping
  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Hangovers (symptoms include: headache, nausea, thirst, dizziness, and fatigue)

The Greater Dallas Council on Alcohol & Drug Abuse states that the long-term effects of consuming large quantities of alcohol can lead to:

  • Permanent damage to vital organs
  • Several different types of cancer
  • Gastrointestinal irritations, such as diarrhea and ulcers
  • Malnutrition and nutritional deficiencies
  • Sexual dysfunctions
  • High blood pressure
  • Lowered resistance to disease

Tarzana Treatment Centers in Los Angeles provides alcohol detox as part of our commitment to integrated behavioral healthcare in alcohol and drug treatment.  If you or a loved one needs help with alcohol dependence, please call us now at 888-777-8565 or contact us here.

Southern California Locations for Alcohol and Drug Treatment
Tarzana Treatment Centers has locations all over Southern California in Los Angeles County. Other than our central location in Tarzana, we have facilities in Lancaster in the Antelope Valley, Long Beach, and in Northridge and Reseda in the San Fernando Valley.

Alcohol Withdrawal

by James Heller 11. September 2009 14:31
Alcohol’s effects on the body are compounded as use increases.  Social drinking is not at issue here.  Once that line is crossed into binge drinking and hangovers, the damage has begun.  Most people realize that a simple hangover is a sign of alcohol withdrawal.  But some accept it as a side effect, and continue to harm themselves.

What deserves publicity, though, is the profound effect alcohol dependence has on the human body.  In most cases medical detoxification can reverse the physical symptoms of withdrawal, opening the door to outpatient rehab or residential alcohol and drug treatment.  This article is a public service to those who are currently in need of alcohol detox, or find themselves on the road to alcohol dependence.

The following is from the Daily Strength website, and offers some good information about alcohol withdrawal.  The full article is linked below and provides details on the stages of alcohol dependence.

-- Begin external content –

Alcohol detox or withdrawal symptoms that are experienced by people who have stopped drinking alcohol abruptly (cold turkey) can range from mild to life-threatening if not properly treated.  The severity of these alcohol withdrawal symptoms is usually dependent upon how “alcohol dependent” the chronic drinker has become.  

Those who drink heavily of a daily basis of course have developed a high level of dependency on alcohol and will almost certainly experience at least some sever withdrawal symptoms, but even those who drink alcohol daily, but not heavily and those who drink alcohol heavily but not daily, can also be chemically dependent upon alcohol.

When someone who has become “alcohol dependent” stops drinking abruptly, they will experience some level of physical discomfort.  This is why it is extremely difficult for alcoholics to stop drinking “on their own” without the assistance and support of an alcohol rehab center of support group.

For some who are less chemically dependent, withdrawal symptoms might be as mild as merely getting the shakes, the sweats or night sweats – maybe nausea, headache, anxiety, a rapid heartbeat and increased blood pressure.

Although these alcohol withdrawal symptoms are uncomfortable and irritating they are not necessarily dangerous.  But they are often accompanied by the craving for more alcohol, making the decision to continue abstinence much more difficult to make without counseling or support.



Within six to 48 hours after not drinking, hallucinations may develop for the more seriously alcohol dependent.  These are usually visual hallucinations but they can also involve sounds and smells.  They can last for a few hours or up to weeks at a time. Also within this time frame after quitting, convulsions or seizures can occur, which is the point at which alcoholism and alcohol withdrawal becomes dangerous if not medically treated.



Chronic alcoholism and it`s severe withdrawal symptoms may progress to delirium tremens (DT`s) after three to five days without alcohol.  The symptoms of DT`s include profound confusion, disorientation, hallucinations, hyperactivity and extreme cardiovascular disturbances.  This condition causes shifts in your breathing, your circulation and your temperature control.  It can cause your heart to race or can cause your blood pressure to increase dramatically and it can cause serious dehydration.
Once DT`s begin, there is no known medical treatment to stop them.  Grand mal seizures, heart attacks and strokes can occur during the DT`s all of these serious alcohol withdrawal symptoms can be fatal to an alcoholic if not properly treated.

-- Source: http://www.dailystrength.org/c/Alcoholism/forum/6363758-stages-alcohol-withdrawal-symptoms --

Tarzana Treatment Centers in Los Angeles provides alcohol detox in alcohol treatment as part of our commitment to integrated behavioral healthcare.  If you or a loved one needs help with alcoholism, please call us now at 888-777-8565 or contact us here.

Tarzana Treatment Centers in Los Angeles makes a daily effort to find treatment news articles that we can share with our readers in the alcohol and drug treatment community.  The external content was found among other articles of equal informational and educational quality.

Southern California Locations for Alcohol and Drug Treatment
Tarzana Treatment Centers has locations all over Southern California in Los Angeles County. Other than our central location in Tarzana, we have facilities in Lancaster in the Antelope Valley, Long Beach, and in Northridge and Reseda in the San Fernando Valley.

Alcohol Abuse Facts

by James Heller 8. September 2009 12:37
Alcoholism is a disease — a chronic, progressive, fatal disease if not treated. That is putting it bluntly, yet in this country every year; more money is spent promoting the use of alcohol than any other product. It sounds insane, but as we often say, “it is what it is” till we do something about it.

Here are some facts that validate the insanity of alcohol abuse and addiction:
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  • More than 100,000 U.S. deaths are caused by excessive alcohol consumption each year. Direct and indirect causes of death include drunk driving, cirrhosis of the liver, falls, cancer, and stroke.
  • At least once a year, the guidelines for low risk drinking are exceeded by an estimated 74% of male drinkers and 72% of female drinkers aged 21 and older.
  • 65% of youth surveyed said that they got the alcohol they drink from family and friends.
  • Nearly 14 million Americans meet diagnostic criteria for alcohol use disorders.
  • Youth who drink alcohol are 50 times more likely to use cocaine than those who never drink alcohol.
  • Among current adult drinkers, more than half say they have a blood relative who is or was an alcoholic or problem drinker.
  • Across people of all ages, males are four times as likely as females to be heavy drinkers.
  • More than 18% of Americans experience alcohol abuse or alcohol dependence at some time in their lives.
  • Traffic crashes are the greatest single cause of death for persons aged 6–33. About 45% of these fatalities are in alcohol-related crashes.
  • Underage drinking costs the United States more than $58 billion every year — enough to buy every public school student a state-of-the-art computer.
  • Alcohol is the most commonly used drug among young people.
  • Problem drinkers average four times as many days in the hospital as nondrinkers — mostly because of drinking-related injuries.
  • Alcohol kills 6½ times more youth than all other illicit drugs combined.
  • Concerning the past 30 days, 50% of high school seniors report drinking, with 32% report being drunk at least once.

Sources
     1  Substance Abuse: The Nation’s Number One Health Problem, Feb. 2001
     2  Mothers Against Drunk Driving
     3  National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse
     4  National Highway Traffic Safety Administration
     5  Alcohol Health & Research World
     6  National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism Analysis
     7  The Century Council


-- Source: http://www.gdcada.org/statistics/alcohol.htm --

Here are some more facts that may surprise you:
-- Begin external content --

  • Alcohol is the number one drug problem in America.
  • There are more than 12 million alcoholics in the U.S.
  • Three-fourths of all adults drink alcohol, and 6% of them are alcoholics.
  • Americans spend $197 million each day on alcohol.
  • In the United States, a person is killed in an alcohol-related car accident every 30 minutes.
  • A 2000 study found nearly 7 million persons age 12 to 20 were binge drinkers.
  • Three-fourths of all high school seniors report being drunk at least once.
  • Adolescents who begin drinking before the age of 15 are four times more likely to become alcoholics than their counterparts who do not begin drinking until the age of 21.
  • People with a higher education are more likely to drink.
  • Higher income people are more likely to drink.

We hope some of these statistics surprised you. You may have found yourself in them or you may have seen a friend or loved one listed above.  But even if not, we cannot ignore the fact that whether or not we use alcohol ourselves, many others are affected by those who do use.

Consider that alcohol is a factor in the following:

  • 73% of all felonies
  • 73% of child beating cases
  • 41% of rape cases
  • 81% of wife battering cases
  • 72% of stabbings
  • 83% of homicides

-- Source: http://www.learn-about-alcoholism.com/statistics-on-alcoholics.html--


So, adding it all up, 12-14 million alcoholics affect an estimated 40-50 million people.  Statistics on alcoholics tell us that alcoholism costs the people in the US about $60 billion each year, paying for things like traffic accidents, health care costs, and social programs that respond to alcohol problems. Needless to say, the dollar amount is nothing compared to the amount of grief and human suffering caused by alcohol abuse.

What do these statistics on alcohol abuse mean and what can you do about it? Quite simply, alcohol abuse is a serious national problem but the work begins at home.  Alcohol treatment must be sought by alcoholics, or loved ones must urge them to get help for alcohol dependence before problems develop.  If you or a loved one is having problems with alcohol, get help.

Tarzana Treatment Centers in Los Angeles provides alcohol treatment including medical detoxification as part of our commitment to integrated behavioral healthcare.  If you or a loved one needs alcohol detox with residential or outpatient treatment, please call us now at 888-777-8565 or contact us here.

Southern California Locations for Alcohol and Drug Treatment
Tarzana Treatment Centers has locations all over Southern California in Los Angeles County. Other than our central location in Tarzana, we have facilities in Lancaster in the Antelope Valley, Long Beach, and in Northridge and Reseda in the San Fernando Valley.

Living with your Liver

by James Heller 25. August 2009 08:05
Many people with chronic alcohol dependence or other drug addictions experience liver disease. This is no accident. The liver is used to digest food, absorb nutrients, and get toxic substances (like alcohol and drugs) out of your body. The liver is an important organ in the body; you only have one and cannot survive without it.  And with alcohol’s effects on the body, liver problems could just be the beginning.

Alcohol abuse is not the only way to damage your liver. Unprotected sex, sharing needles, prescription drug abuse and addiction, and getting tattoos or piercings from places that do not properly sterilize the needles also can put you at risk of liver disease and damage.

There are many forms of liver disease; the conditions listed below are most common among alcohol and other drug abusers.

Cirrhosis – scarring of the liver that is caused by having another liver disease (like Hepatitis), or by many years of heavy alcohol drinking. Cirrhosis is not curable, but there are treatments that can help slow the scarring.

Hepatitis C – a disease that is passed through blood-to-blood contact. It is caused by a virus that attacks the liver, causing the liver to become inflamed. There is a cure, but it takes months to complete treatment, has severe side effects, and does not work for everyone.

Hepatitis A – a disease that is similar to the flu.  You get Hepatitis A by eating food containing human waste. People rarely die from it, and there is a vaccine to prevent you from getting it.

Hepatitis B – a disease that is passed through body fluids during sex, through the breast milk of infected mothers, and through contact with contaminated blood. People can die from it, but there is a vaccine to prevent it.

The best way to prevent liver disease is to not abuse alcohol or use illegal drugs.  Only use drugs as prescribed by your doctor, or as indicated on over-the-counter packaging.  Never engage in unprotected sex (unless you and your partner are completely monogamous and have tested negative for all STI’s recently).

If you have not been vaccinated for Hepatitis A and B, talk with your doctor to see if it is right for you. There are treatments and some liver disease is reversible, so talk to your doctor about the choices that are out there.

For most information, check out the American Liver Foundation website: http://www.yourliver.org/learn.html.

If you or a loved one need help for alcoholism or drug addiction, and also suffer from liver disease, Tarzana Treatment Centers in Los Angeles can help.  As part of our commitment to integrated behavioral healthcare, our alcohol and drug treatment program includes primary medical care.  Please call us now at 888-777-8565 or contact us here.

Southern California Locations for Alcohol and Drug Treatment
Tarzana Treatment Centers has locations all over Southern California in Los Angeles County. Other than our central location in Tarzana, we have facilities in Lancaster in the Antelope Valley, Long Beach, and in Northridge and Reseda in the San Fernando Valley.

Alcohol and Drug Abuse Effects on Oral Health

by James Heller 24. August 2009 14:01

We know that drug and alcohol abuse has many negative health effects, but something that is not frequently discussed are the harmful effects that drugs and alcohol can have on the health of our teeth, gums, and mouth in general.  Good oral health is not just about having pearly white and straight teeth.  

Having strong teeth and healthy gums/mouth helps you eat and digest food, and helps you speak and pronounce words clearly. Left untreated, decay on the teeth leads to the formation of cavities which can become infected and spread throughout your whole body making you sick

While all drugs can have negative effects on your teeth, gums, and mouth, methamphetamine (meth) and tobacco (both in cigarettes and smokeless) are the worst offenders.

Methamphetamine: The use of meth has been linked to rapid formation of cavities. Dentists think this could be due to teeth grinding and clenching, dry mouth, or poor oral hygiene all of which are linked to meth use. When left untreated, the only treatment is to pull out all the teeth and wear dentures.

For more information about meth and oral health go here: http://www.ada.org/prof/resources/topics/methmouth.asp#additional

Tobacco: Both cigarettes and smokeless tobacco have harmful effects on the health of the mouth. Cigarettes can lead to dry mouth and gum disease. Dry mouth negatively affects oral health because without saliva to rinse off the teeth, bacteria grows on teeth and near the gums which can quickly become decay which then leads to cavities. Smokeless tobacco seriously damages gums and increases the risk of oral cancer.

For more information about tobacco and oral health go here:
http://www.hooah4health.com/prevention/disease/dentaldisease/oralfitresources/TobaccoAndOralHealth.pdf

If you are concerned about the health of your teeth/gums there are a few easy steps to take:

  1. Make an appointment with your dentist; current guidelines recommend seeing your dentist every six months.
  2. Brush your teeth at least twice a day with toothpaste that contains fluoride. Fluoride keeps teeth strong and may stop or slow down the formation of decay.
  3. Floss your teeth daily. You must floss in order to remove food from in between teeth and near the gum line – your toothbrush does not reach everywhere in your mouth.
  4. Drink water – Sugary drinks (including alcohol) coat your teeth in sugar, which is the basis for tooth decay. By drinking water you are removing food and sugar from your teeth.


Visit this site for basic information about keeping your mouth, teeth, and gums healthy:
http://www.adha.org/oralhealth/index.html


Tarzana Treatment Centers in Los Angeles provides alcohol and drug treatment that includes nutritional education as part of our commitment to integrated behavioral healthcare.  For more information, please call us now at 888-777-8565 or contact us here.

Southern California Locations for Alcohol and Drug Treatment
Tarzana Treatment Centers has locations all over Southern California in Los Angeles County. Other than our central location in Tarzana, we have facilities in Lancaster in the Antelope Valley, Long Beach, and in Northridge and Reseda in the San Fernando Valley.

Rethinking Drinking

by James Heller 13. July 2009 07:20
Often, problems due to alcohol abuse or dependence sneak up on an individual.  This is because it is a progressive disease.  Non-drinkers simply do not become alcohol abusers and alcoholics over night.  But it can happen over time, so it is not a bad idea to take a self-evaluation to see if a problem is developing.

Most people can make a choice between drinking alcohol or not in social situations.  They can also decide when to stop once they start.  This is normal social drinking, and the pattern generally remains the same for life with few exceptions.

Some individuals increase the amount of alcohol they drink per session or of days per week they imbibe.  The change is typically gradual so it can go unnoticed for some time, even by those who are changing habits, to some extent.  But they know something is different and may not know where to get information.  Friends and family may not know how to point out the increases without confrontation.

The National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism has posted a resource that helps individuals evaluate their drinking patterns.  It is very simple and can encourage individuals to change drinking habits before alcohol treatment is needed.  Loved ones can possibly use it to convince someone to enter alcohol detox and treatment.

Click on the link below to take the test:
http://rethinkingdrinking.niaaa.nih.gov/default.asp

Tarzana Treatment Centers in Los Angeles makes a daily effort to find treatment resources that we can share with our readers in the alcohol and drug treatment community.  The external content was found among other articles of equal informational and educational quality.

Southern California Locations for Alcohol and Drug Treatment
Tarzana Treatment Centers has locations all over Southern California in Los Angeles County and Orange County. Other than our central location in Tarzana, we have facilities in Lancaster in the Antelope Valley, Long Beach, in Northridge and Reseda in the San Fernando Valley, and in Santa Ana.

Women in Alcohol Treatment

by James Heller 30. April 2009 07:59
April, 2009 marks the 22nd year of Alcohol Awareness Month.  

Tarzana Treatment Centers is participating with a series of articles meant to inform and educate the general public about alcohol abuse, dependence and treatment.  Considering that over 21 million Americans meet the criteria for alcohol abuse and over 53 million admit to past-month binge drinking, not to mention the many loved ones affected by each, our efforts are worthwhile.

The percentages of women who enter alcohol treatment and remain through completion are lower than for men.  Reasons for the difference appear to revolve around family and security.

Alcohol dependent mothers may know they need detox and treatment.  But some do not have the resources or family to provide child care in a time of absence.  Also, depression and false sense of reality due to alcoholism creates fear in leaving children with even the most trusted family members.

Many women with alcohol problems have histories that could make them feel uncomfortable in a coed treatment setting.  The distraction of discomfort, and inability to share feelings freely, makes treatment less effective and is a major reason for early discharges.

Tarzana Treatment Centers offers women-only treatment, including a facility for women and children.  As noted in the report excerpt below from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration this helps women enter treatment and complete it, leading to better lives for our patients and their children.

-- Begin external content --

Child Care Services

Most studies that evaluated the effectiveness of providing child care services to female clients in substance abuse treatment examined services for children living with their mothers in a residential treatment program. In one clinical trial, females who lived with their children in therapeutic community treatment programs remained in treatment significantly longer (mean length of stay [LOS] = 300 days) than females whose children were placed with caretakers (mean LOS = 102 days) (Hughes et al., 1995). Less rigorous studies also found that program changes enabling women to bring their children into residential treatment were associated with increased LOS (e.g., Stevens, Arbiter, & Glider, 1989; Wobie, Eyler, Conlon, Clarke, & Behnke, 1997). One study found that measures of depression were lower and measures of self-esteem were higher for females whose infants accompanied them to the treatment facility compared with females who did not have their infants in the treatment facility (Wobie et al., 1997). This study suggested that the earlier a mother's infant resides with her in the treatment setting, the longer the mother will stay in treatment.

Women-Only Treatment

Using a nonrandomized design, Grella and colleagues (1999) found that females treated in publicly funded women-only residential treatment programs in Los Angeles reported they had more problems, such as mental health issues and substance severity, than females at mixed-gender programs. However, the clients in women-only programs actually spent more time in treatment and were more than twice as likely to complete treatment than females in mixed-gender programs. In contrast, programs that treat male and female clients together are less able to attract and retain especially vulnerable females, such as lesbian women, women with a history of physical or sexual violence, women who have worked as prostitutes, and single parents (Copeland & Hall, 1992; Fullilove, Lown, & Fullilove, 1992; Grella, 1997; Pottieger, Inciardi, & Tressell, 1996).

-- Source: http://www.oas.samhsa.gov/WomenTX/WomenTX.htm#2.4.1

Tarzana Treatment Centers in Los Angeles makes a daily effort to find treatment news articles that we can share with our readers in the alcohol and drug treatment community.  The external content was found among other articles of equal informational and educational quality.