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Teen Access to Drugs

by James Heller 30. September 2009 11:57
A few years ago parents were shocked to discover that teens reported they had easier access to marijuana than alcohol.  Sadly, the shocking news has compounded today.  Not only do teens report that marijuana is as easy to obtain as cigarettes, but alcohol is now considered harder to get than prescription drugs.

Knowing this, parents need to realize that there is nothing they alone can do about teen access to drugs.  The supply is there, so parents should focus on educating adolescents about the dangers involved with drug use.

Obviously, there is a market for all of these drugs or they would not be so readily available.  Studies have shown that teens have a general perception that marijuana and prescription drug use comes with little risk.  In order to discourage teens from using them, parents must correct that notion.

The best defense to youth drug abuse is for parents to educate themselves about overdose, drug-use causing injuries, and how adolescent drug and alcohol abuse affects brain development.  Planting these seeds of wisdom makes teens think before they engage in alcohol or drug use.

The University of Maryland, College Park, has posted data from the 2009 National Survey on American’s Attitudes on Substance Abuse that details drug availability to teens.  The text is below, with a link to the website for CESAR (Center for Substance Abuse Research) following.  Parents can also get more information from our blog’s adolescent drug abuse category.

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Teens are equally likely to say that cigarettes or marijuana are the easiest for them to buy, according to data from the 2009 National Survey on American’s Attitudes on Substance Abuse. Slightly more than one-fourth (26%) of teens said that cigarettes were the easiest for someone their age to buy and the same percentage cited marijuana. The third most prevalent response was prescription drugs (16%), followed by beer (14%). Ten percent of teens reported that they thought all four substances were equally easy to buy. When the parents of these teens were asked which substance they thought was easier for teens their child’s age to buy, more than one-third reported cigarettes (37%), 22% reported marijuana, 12% reported beer, and only 9% reported prescription drugs (data not shown).

-- www.cesar.umd.edu

Tarzana Treatment Centers in Los Angeles makes a daily effort to find treatment news articles that we can share with our readers in the youth alcohol and drug treatment community.  The external content was found among other articles of equal informational and educational quality.

Southern California Locations for Alcohol and Drug Treatment
Tarzana Treatment Centers has locations all over Southern California in Los Angeles County. Other than our central location in Tarzana, we have facilities in Lancaster in the Antelope Valley, Long Beach, and in Northridge and Reseda in the San Fernando Valley.

Websafe Recovery: Protecting Against Pro-Drug Internet Content

by James Heller 16. September 2009 10:40
Tarzana Treatment Centers in Los Angeles is participating in Recovery Month 2009, in part, with articles about recovery during the month of September.  Most individuals suffering from alcoholism and drug addiction begin their recovery with alcohol and drug treatment.  So it is our pleasure to help bring awareness to the general public about the benefits of recovery to individuals, their families, and everyone with whom they interact.

Adolescent alcohol and drug treatment does not end when a patient completes a program.  The entire family needs to continue recovery through support groups, and by working to make changes in the home.  Many parents will run into trust issues during this time, and find it difficult to keep drugs out of their households.

Recovery is a daily process.  Families join their teens in recovery by working on their own co-dependencies in support groups.  Any family affected by drug addiction would benefit with this course of action.  But the teen addiction recovery process brings another element in that parents feel responsible if drugs re-enter the home.

Advancements in technology have made it difficult to maintain a drug-free home.  It is very easy for a teen to purchase drugs over the internet at online pharmacies.  But that’s not all.  There is a growing list of sites that not only promote drug use as healthy, but also “educate” visitors about lesser known drugs and how to obtain them.  These sites actually promote the sharing of experiences with substances that can cause serious damage or death.

Until now, web monitoring software and services have targeted pornography.  WebSafe plans to change that trend.  This new website offers services and software that aim to prevent teens from using home computers to reach sites that sell drugs or discuss use.  The services reach far beyond these and include the ability for parents to video conference with each other and get expert advice from professionals.

The WebSafe website requires free registration to join.  Some information about the site’s purpose is below, followed by the link.  Families impacted by teen drug abuse can certainly benefit from the resources that are now available, making long-term recovery possible for their children.  

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Managing the problems of addiction is complex.  We have introduced the LIFEGUARD product as a first step in our creation of a broad community of consumers and professionals exploring the challenges of substance abuse.  And while we recognize that user control software is not for everyone, we hope that you will join with us and become a vocal member of a community of concerned individuals that want to help each other understand and manage this complicated and chronic disease.

It’s time to use the web for what it does best – connect people, information and institutions – which we think our collection of information services will allow you to do.  Our RESOURCES  service is a starting point and one of the nmost basic things we will be bringing to our growing community membership.

-- Source: https://www.websafeparent.com/websafe/ --

Tarzana Treatment Centers in Los Angeles provides youth alcohol and drug treatment that includes family groups and alumni support.  If you or your teen needs help with drug abuse, please call us now at 888-777-8565 or contact us here.

Southern California Locations for Alcohol and Drug Treatment
Tarzana Treatment Centers has locations all over Southern California in Los Angeles County. Other than our central location in Tarzana, we have facilities in Lancaster in the Antelope Valley, Long Beach, and in Northridge and Reseda in the San Fernando Valley.

Adolescent Drug Abuse and Addiction

by James Heller 9. September 2009 11:53
There are many detrimental effects that drug abuse and drug addiction can have on an adolescent.  Even prescription drugs cause negative side effects to adults when they are used properly.  So abuse and addiction of any kind of drug have serious negative effects.

It is important for the adolescent body to develop unimpeded in order to become a healthy adult body.  Drug abuse and addiction interferes with this process.  Depending on the substance being used, and the age of the user, substance use can cause the following:

  • Alter normal brain development and/or cause lasting brain damage that will affect the young person’s moods, tolerance to stress and frustration, and intellectual capacity.
  • Negatively impact the development of healthy self-esteem and healthy social relationships.
  • Hinder the development of healthy and adaptive coping strategies.  Because drugs and alcohol inhibit one’s sense of time, using drugs and alcohol can provide temporary relief or a “quick fix” to pain, and lead the individual to avoid developing lasting solutions and problem solving strategies.
  • Substance use can lower inhibitions and negatively impact a person’s judgment, which may lead to unwanted pregnancy, sexually transmitted diseases, aggression, and violence.  In other words, individuals may find themselves engaging in dangerous behaviors that put them at risk for engaging in activities that can negatively affect how they see themselves.
  • Continued use of alcohol and other drugs can lead to addiction and dependence.  While not shown to be a linear logical progression of use in every user, many substance users do move on to harder, more dangerous drugs the more they become immersed in the drug culture.  Alcoholism is considered, however, to be a progressive illness that results in more detrimental physical and social deterioration over the course of time.

Tarzana Treatment Centers in Los Angeles provides adolescent alcohol and drug treatment as part of our commitment to integrated behavioral healthcareAlcohol and drug detox is also available in cases of alcohol dependence and drug addiction.  If you or a loved one needs help with adolescent alcohol abuse or drug abuse, please call us now at 888-777-8565 or contact us here.

Southern California Locations for Alcohol and Drug Treatment
Tarzana Treatment Centers has locations all over Southern California in Los Angeles County. Other than our central location in Tarzana, we have facilities in Lancaster in the Antelope Valley, Long Beach, and in Northridge and Reseda in the San Fernando Valley.

California Drug Use Survey

by James Heller 27. May 2009 07:35
California alcohol and drug treatment professionals know well that drug addiction continues to be a problem in this state.  Surveys are a good tool for providing facts to the general public, since most people are not aware of the extent drugs effect society.  So it is important to keep this information flowing in order to bring greater awareness to California citizens.

A recent opinion poll taken by an online resource for addiction and substance abuse information found that marijuana remains the most popular drug abused in California.  The poll focused on use rather than drug addiction, and provides a look at what the future may hold for today’s adolescents.

Of the parents polled who stated their children have used drugs almost 25% listed methamphetamines, cocaine, heroin, ecstasy, hallucinogens, or recreational use of prescription drugs as the child’s drug of choice.  This is a very real future problem for California.  Children who use these drugs are at high risk of developing a drug addiction or even cross over to alcohol dependence by the time they are adults.

Tarzana Treatment Centers provides adolescent alcohol and drug treatment.  For more information please call 888-777-8565 or contact us here.

Here are some points of interest from the report on www.keepcomingback.com.  For poll result details, go to http://www.keepcomingback.com/files/KCBDrugPollTopline.pdf.

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The survey found that nearly half (44%) of Californians have tried marijuana at least once and 1 in 6 residents have used the drug within the last year. Clearly it is the most common drug used, in a category far different than cocaine (13% said they had previously used), methamphetamines (9%) or have used prescription drugs without a doctor’s order (9%).

KeepComingBack.com also explored how Californians view the impact of drug use. Consistent with its widespread use, respondents had a very different attitude about marijuana, with only 30% saying that the drug was very harmful. This contrasts with the harm that participants believe results from using cocaine (91% saying it was very harmful) or heroin (96% saying it was very harmful).

The survey also found that nearly one in four Californians with at least one child over the age of 10 reported that their offspring has tried illegal drugs. Another 11% were unsure about whether their children had tried illegal drugs. As with adults, by far the most prevalent drug used by children was marijuana (60.6%) though a disturbing number of parents (11.7% of the subsample) reported that the main drug their child used was methamphetamine.

-- Source: http://www.keepcomingback.com/node/1463 --

Tarzana Treatment Centers in Los Angeles makes a daily effort to find treatment news articles that we can share with our readers in the alcohol and drug treatment community.  The external content was found among other articles of equal informational and educational quality.

Adolescents With Co-occurring Disorders

by James Heller 6. May 2009 14:21
May, 2009 is National Mental Health Month.  

Tarzana Treatment Centers is participating with a series of articles meant to inform and educate the general public about mental health issues as related to substance abuse, dependence and alcohol and drug treatment.  A growing percentage of alcohol and drug treatment admissions include co-occurring mental health disorders.  Special care is needed to ensure recovery for these patients, as is provided at Tarzana Treatment Centers.

Adolescents with co-occurring substance abuse and mental health disorders have an opportunity to live normal lives in recovery if they seek treatment.  But parents must first know when alcohol or drug treatment is needed and where to get it.  Tarzana Treatment Centers specializes in alcohol and drug treatment, along with integrated behavioral healthcare to treat co-occurring mental health disorders.

The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration provides some good information on when a teen is more likely to be using alcohol or drugs.  Below is a section of an informative report that can be helpful for parents of adolescents with behavioral issues.  The full report is more detailed.

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Emotional Problems and Alcohol or Illicit Drug Dependence

The severity of emotional problems is associated with increased likelihood of adolescent alcohol or illicit drug dependence. Adolescents with significant emotional problems were nearly four times as likely to report dependence as were those with low emotional problem scores. Alcohol or illicit drug dependence was reported by approximately 3 percent of adolescents with low emotional problem scores, by 7 percent of those with intermediate problem scores, and by 13 percent with significant emotional problems. Within specific age groups, the prevalence of dependence was consistently higher for adolescents with more serious emotional problems, with the exception of adolescent males aged 12 to 13. Older adolescents with serious emotional problems had the highest rates of dependence on alcohol or illicit drugs: 23 percent for males 19 percent for females. The corresponding rates for younger adolescents aged 12 to 13 were 3 percent for males and 9 percent for females.

Behavioral Problems and Alcohol or Illicit Drug Dependence

The severity of behavioral problems is associated with increased likelihood of alcohol or illicit drug dependence. Adolescents with significant behavioral problems were over seven times more likely to report dependence than those with low behavioral problem scores. Alcohol or illicit drug dependence was reported by approximately 2 percent of adolescents with low behavioral problem scores, by 6 percent of those with intermediate problem scores, and by 17 percent of those with significant behavioral problems.

Within specific age groups, dependence increased with the severity of behavioral problems. This pattern was observed among both males and females for very young adolescents aged 12 to 13, for adolescents aged 14 to 15, and for older adolescents aged 16 to 17. Dependence on alcohol or illicit drugs was highest among older adolescents aged 16 to 17 with serious behavioral problems (26 percent). The corresponding rates for very young adolescents aged 12 to 13 were 4 percent for males and 9 percent for females.

-- Source: http://www.oas.samhsa.gov/NHSDA/A-9/comorb3c-38.htm --

Tarzana Treatment Centers in Los Angeles makes a daily effort to find treatment news articles that we can share with our readers in the alcohol and drug treatment community.  The external content was found among other articles of equal informational and educational quality.